Greg Johnson

Greg Johnson, whose reviews have appeared regularly in our pages across many years, has published two novels, five collections of short stories, and several volumes of nonfiction. He lives in Atlanta and teaches in the graduate writing program at Kennesaw State University.

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Natural Selection (on The Wick of Memory: New and Selected Poems, 1970-2000 by Dave Smith; Knowing: New and Selected Poems by Jonathan Holden; The Blessing: New and Selected Poems by Richard Jones; Selected Poems of Anne Sexton by Anne Sexton, edited and with an introduction by Diane Wood Middlebrook and Diana Hume George; Sweet Confluence: New and Selected Poems by Susan Ludvigson; and The Selected Levis by Larry Levis, selected and with an afterword by David St. John)

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The Best and the Briefest (on The O. Henry Prize Stories 2007: The Best Stories of the Year, edited by Laura Furman; New Stories from the South: 2006—The Year’s Best, edited by Allan Gurganus; Best New American Voices 2007: Fresh Fiction from the Top Writing Programs, edited by Sue Miller; Flash Fiction Forward: 80 Very Short Stories, edited by James Thomas and Robert Shapard; and New Sudden Fiction: Short-Short Stories from America and Beyond, edited by Robert Shapard and James Thomas)

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Barding Around (on Robert Frost Speaking on Campus: Excerpts from His Talks, 1949–1962, edited by Edward Connery Lathem; Maxine Kumin’s The Roots of Things: Essays; Mark Doty’s The Art of Description: World into Word; Ellen Bryant Voigt’s The Art of Syntax: Rhythm of Thought, Rhythm of Song; Dean Young’s The Art of Recklessness: Poetry as Assertive Force and Contradiction; Kelly Cherry’s Girl in a Library: On Women Writers and the Writing Life; and Fanny Howe’s The Winter Sun: Notes on a Vocation)

Reviews

The Many Lives of Sylvia Plath

Sylvia Plath, arguably the greatest female poet of the twentieth century, has been the object of much biographical scrutiny, the more so because her suicide at age thirty seems inextricably bound up with her finest work and because, more generally, her life and writing have been the cause of much controversy. It seems likely that […]

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