Lindsay Tigue

Lindsay Tigue won the Iowa Poetry Prize for her first book, System of Ghosts (University of Iowa Press, 2016). She writes poetry and prose and her work appears in Prairie Schooner, Indiana Review, Hayden’s Ferry Review, and elsewhere. Tigue, a Sewanee Writers’ Conference scholar and Vermont Studio Center fellow, holds an MFA from Iowa State University and is currently a PhD student in creative writing at the University of Georgia.

Reviews

on Bright Dead Things by Ada Limón

Ada Limón’s poetry recognizes the ways shifting landscapes throw order into chaos. In Bright Dead Things, her fourth collection, the mutable settings—from New York to Kentucky to California—serve to underscore the speaker’s turbulent feelings of loss. Limón’s speaker ties her self-conception to landscape. She says, “This land and I are rewilding” and “Now, we take […]

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Conversations

“Grief Can Be Stitched To Us”: An Interview with Brenda Peynado

Lindsay Tigue (LT): I really enjoyed “The Stones of Sorrow Lake,” and was impressed by the story’s central idea—how in Jackson’s hometown everyone’s first great sorrow becomes literally visible in the form of stones and then scars. This idea makes wonderfully resonant both the physical weight of grief as well as the lingering effects of […]

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Conversations

An Interview with Earth Day’s Alison Hawthorne Deming

Lindsay Tigue (LT): Thank you so much for taking the time to answer some questions. I am such an admirer of your poems and essays. You’ve appeared in the pages of The Georgia Review several times. Can you talk a little bit about that publication history and your relationship with the magazine over the years? […]

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Conversations

The Unshakeable Image: A Conversation with Siân Griffiths

Lindsay Tigue: Thanks so much for taking the time to answer some questions. I really enjoyed “Sk8r,” and I particularly admired the way you portrayed the protagonist Ilsa’s treatment of Angie. Twelve-year-old Ilsa is a very relatable young protagonist and you allow her to act badly—even meanly—to ten-year-old Angie. Can you talk a little bit […]

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