Conversations

Beyond Muscle Memory: An Interview with Farrah Karapetian

Artist Farrah Karapetian’s oeuvre locates emotional weight in the physical making of her often politically rooted subject material. In the case of Muscle Memory, featured in our Fall 2015 issue, Karapetian’s focus, as indicated, is the muscle memory of U.S. Armed Forces veterans and their relationships to their weapons. . . .

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Rich in Word Love: A Conversation with Colette Inez

Doug Carlson: Halfway into “Stamp Fever,” the reader suddenly realizes that things aren’t what they seem; that is, a different level of reality has taken over. As the boy’s world becomes more magical, his need is more apparent and our compassion for him increases. This move toward magical realism put me in mind of some of the more surrealistic elements in your poems. . . .

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Divided in So Many Ways: A Discussion with Karen Hays

Thibault Raoult: “Auto-Duet” is heartbreaking, illuminating work, which, while possessing airtight transitions, nonetheless leaves me, as reader, bouncing around in the ideational echo chamber you so seamlessly build. Rather than continue to bounce around (poignant as that may be), I’ll begin with the end of your essay, where you are in the hospital post-surgery: “Baby’s just fine,” says the doctor, . . .

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“We’re really verbs”: An Interview with Margaret Gibson

Thibault Raoult: Upon first encounter with your new book Broken Cup, I’m taken back to Donald Hall’s Without—his poetic confrontation with the death of his poet wife Jane Kenyon. The circumstances are different in each book, to be sure, but nonetheless the reader senses at once a reeling and holistic aspect to the work. . . .

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On The View from Saturn & More: An Interview with Alice Friman

Gina Abelkop: L is for Leaves,” your poem in our Summer 2014 issue, begins softly, with a meditation on daily routine and watching the leaves outside through a window, but ends with a darker finish with the narrator “not knowing / which of us is screaming, Hold on, . . .

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Odd Objects, Discomfort, & Joy: A Conversation with Lisa Knopp

John Brown Spiers: Your essays are layered almost impossibly well. Not only are they never about just one thing (or even just a couple of things), they very rarely meander, or “essay,” in the sense of a journey without a firm destination or even a firm path. Similarly, you admit from the outset of “Still Life with Peaches” . . .

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“For as long as I wish”: Paul Zimmer on Solace and Oblivion

John Brown Spiers: From the outset of “Secret Information,” you inform us that you’ve written the essay because “I feel obligated to relate something about that ominous place I had been taken to under the Nevada desert, and the abyss I peered into.” And, near the end, you realize that the scientist who serves as a kind of tour guide at the edge of the abyss, . . .

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