Cottonwoods

Rex Adams, originally from Coulee City, Washington, currently resides in Owyhee County near Marsing, Idaho. His work has appeared in several print and online journals, including CRAFT, Confrontation, Sky Island Journal, and The Cabin’s Writers in the Attic: Song Anthology. He makes his living in the construction industry and is the father of two young daughters.

Worthy to Receive, or “Even a blind pig gets a truffle now and then”: Philip Levine and Me

Rick Campbell is a poet and essayist who lives on Alligator Point, Florida.

I Knew Some of Them, But They All Knew Me

Amy Wright is the author of two poetry books, one collaboration, and six chapbooks. Most recently her essays won first place in contests sponsored by London Magazine and Quarterly West. She has also received two Peter Taylor Fellowships to the Kenyon Review Writers Workshop, an Individual Artist Grant from the Tennessee Arts Commission, and a fellowship to Virginia Center for the Creative Arts. Wright’s essays have appeared or are forthcoming in Brevity, Fourth Genre, Ninth Letter, and elsewhere.

Taabu and the Vibe

Gerald Majer’s poetry, fiction, and essays have appeared in Callaloo, FIELD, The Georgia Review (several times), Puerto del Sol, Quarterly West, Yale Review, and other journals; his creative-nonfiction book The Velvet Lounge was published by Columbia University Press in 2005. Majer teaches literature and creative writing at Stevenson University in Baltimore, Maryland. 

Painting Bermuda’s Past: Cy Gavin Shares the Stories Behind His Paintings

Cy Gavin’s paintings have been exhibited at the Whitney Museum of American Art and Sargent’s Daughters in New York, the Rubell Family Collection in Miami, the VNH Gallery in Paris, and many other venues. He lives and works in New …

on Otherworld, Underworld, Prayer Porch by David Bottoms

Floyd Collins earned his MFA and PhD at the University of Arkansas. A book of critical essays on poetry, The Living Artifact, is forthcoming from Stephen F. Austin University Press in spring 2021. The Teresa Poems will appear from Somondoco Press in fall 2021. His poetry and critical prose appear regularly with The Arkansas Review, The Georgia Review, The Gettysburg Review, and The Kenyon Review.

on Lost Time: Lectures on Proust in a Soviet Prison Camp by Józef Czapski, translated from the French by Eric Karpeles

Jonathan Russell Clark is the author of An Oasis of Horror in a Desert of Boredom (Fiction Advocate Press, 2018) and the forthcoming Skateboard (Bloomsbury Academic Press, 2022). His work has appeared in the New York Times Book Review, the San Francisco Chronicle, Tin House, Vulture, and numerous other publications.

The Spanish Civil War: Harbinger of World War II (on Antony Beevor’s The Battle for Spain: The Spanish Civil War 1936–1939; Paul Preston’s The Spanish Civil War: Reaction, Revolution, and Revenge, revised and expanded edition, and We Saw Spain Die: Foreign Correspondents in the Spanish Civil War; Henry Buckley’s The Life and Death of the Spanish Republic: A Witness to the Spanish Civil War; Stanley G. Payne’s The Spanish Civil War; Nick Lloyd’s Forgotten Places: Barcelona and the Spanish Civil War; ¡No Pasarán!: Writings from the Spanish Civil War, edited by Pete Ayrton; George Orwell’s Homage to Catalonia; Enrique Moradiellos’s Franco: Anatomy of a Dictator; Mercè Rodoreda’s In Diamond Square, translated by Peter Bush; Emili Teixidor’s Black Bread, translated by Peter Bush; Lydie Salvayre’s Cry, Mother Spain, translated by Ben Faccini; and Manuel Rivas’s The Low Voices, translated by Jonathan Dunne)

Karen Swenson has published five volumes of poetry, been included in numerous anthologies, and appeared in The New Yorker, Saturday Review, Poetry, Commonweal, Miramar, The Nation, and other publications. Also the author of travel and political articles for the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times, Swenson presently lives in Barcelona, Spain.

Ode to Whitman’s “They do not think whom they souse with spray”; Ode to Tennyson’s “Some one had blunder’d”; Ode to Frost’s “And they, since they / Were not the one dead, turned to their affairs.”

Kimiko Hahn, author of nine books, finds that disparate sources have influenced her work—among them black lung disease, Flaubert’s sex tour, exhumation, and classical Japanese literary/poetic forms. Rarified fields of science prompted her latest poetry collections, Toxic Flora (2010) and Brain Fever (2014), both from W. W. Norton. A new collection, Foreign Bodies, is forthcoming in 2020. Hahn’s honors include a Guggenheim Fellowship, a PEN/Voelcker Award for Poetry, and a Shelley Memorial Award. She is a distinguished professor in the MFA Program in Creative Writing and Literary Translation at Queens College, City University of New York.