My Own City (on Donna Masini’s 4:30 Movie; Jennifer Franklin’s No Small Gift; and Lee Briccetti’s Blue Guide)

Jonathan Blunk is a poet, essayist, and radio producer. His works include the authorized biography James Wright: A Life in Poetry (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2017) and the essay “ ‘Living Toward That Voice’: James Wright Transfixing and Transfixed,” which appeared in The Georgia Review (Winter 2017). Blunk’s work can also be found in such journals as the American Poetry Review, Poets & Writers, and FIELD magazine.

Underwater Falsetto

Tiana Nobile is a Kundiman fellow and the recipient of a Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers’ Award. A finalist in the National Poetry Series and for the Kundiman Poetry Prize, she is the author of a chapbook, The Spirit of the Staircase (Antenna / Press Street Press, 2017). Her writing has appeared in Poetry Northwest, the New Republic, Guernica, and the Texas Review, among others. 

Young Woman in Blue Reading a Letter

William Virgil Davis’s most recent book of poetry is Dismantlements of Silence: Poems Selected and New (Texas Review Press, 2015). He has published five other books of poetry, among them Landscape and Journey (Ivan R. Dee, 2009), which won the New Criterion Poetry Prize and the Helen C. Smith Memorial Award for Poetry, and One Way to Reconstruct the Scene (1980), winner of the Yale Series of Younger Poets Prize. His poems have appeared in most of the major periodicals, here and abroad, including the Atlantic, the Nation, Poetry, and many others.

In the Time of the Living

Richard Jackson has published fifteen books of poems and is the author or editor of multiple critical monographs, books in translation, and anthologies. His most recent books are Broken Horizons (Press 53, 2018) and Out of Place (Ashland Poetry Press, 2014); “Take Five,” a prose poetry project with four other poets, is forthcoming.

Ode on Your Flaw; Chronic Transience; Early Sightings; & Sarcophagus Poetica

J. Allyn Rosser’s fourth poetry collection, Mimi’s Trapeze, appeared in 2014 from Pittsburgh University Press. Rosser has received fellowships from the Lannan Foundation, the Guggenheim Foundation, the NEA, and the Ohio Arts Council. She teaches at Ohio University.

The Trial

William Wenthe is the author of four books of poems, including his most recent collection, God’s Foolishness (LSU Press, 2016). He has received poetry fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Texas Commission on the Arts, and two Pushcart Prizes. “The Trial” is part of a larger project about the American expatriate painter James McNeill Whistler.

Negative Capability

Margaret Gibson is the current poet laureate of Connecticut and the author of twelve books of poems, all from Louisiana State University Press, most recently Not Hearing the Wood Thrush (2018) and The Glass Globe (forthcoming in 2021), as well as a memoir, The Prodigal Daughter (University of Missouri Press, 2008). The Vigil (1993) was a finalist for the National Book Award in Poetry; Broken Cup (2016) was a finalist for the Poets’ Prize, and its title poem won a Pushcart Prize that year. Gibson is professor emerita at the University of Connecticut.

Translating the Word for Home

 

A small city disappears in

the near-sighted dusk of a coastal winter.

Someone is walking home as I once did.

Someone is thinking as I did once

this is their neighborhood, their consolation.

Once I thought words could describe

Eavan Boland (1944–2020) authored many books over her distinguished career, including, most recently, A Poet’s Dublin (2016) and A Woman Without a Country (2014). Other poetry volumes include Domestic Violence (2007); Against Love Poetry (2001); The Lost Land (1998); and In a Time of Violence (1994). Boland also published two books of prose: A Journey with Two Maps: Becoming a Woman Poet (2011) and Object Lessons: The Life of the Woman and the Poet in Our Time (1995); she also co-edited with Mark Strand and Edward Hirsch the Norton anthologies The Making of a Sonnet (2007) and The Making of a Poem (2000). Her numerous honors include a Lannan Foundation Award in poetry and membership in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences as well as the Royal Irish Academy. Boland directed the creative-writing program at Stanford University. 

Dickinson in Aleppo

Reginald Gibbons has published ten books of poems, most recently Last Lake (University of Chicago Press, 2016); his Creatures of a Day (LSU Press, 2008) was a finalist for the National Book Award. His translations (with Charles Segal) include Sophocles’ Antigone (2003) and Euripides’ Bakkhai (2001), as well as works by poets from Mexico, Spain, and elsewhere. His most recent fiction is An Orchard in the Street (BOA Editions, 2017), and he has also published the critical study How Poems Think (Chicago, 2015).Gibbons is a Frances Hooper Professor of Arts and Humanities at Northwestern University, where he is the director of the new Litowitz MFA+MA Graduate Creative Writing Program.