just another horse poem

Ben Kingsley is best known for his Academy Award–winning role as Mahatma Gandhi. This Ben is a touch less famous, having not acted since his third-grade debut as the Undertaker in The Music Man. An Affrilachian author, Benjamín Naka-Hasebe Kingsley belongs to the Onondaga Nation of Indigenous Americans in New York. His first collection, Not Your Mama’s Melting Pot, came out from Backwaters Press this year; Colonize Me is forthcoming from Saturnalia in 2019 and Dēmos from Milkweed Editions in 2020.

Lines During the Solstice

Jeff Oaks’s most recent poetry chapbook is Mistakes with Strangers, published by Seven Kitchens Press (2014). He has published poems and essays in numerous magazines and in such anthologies as My Diva: 65 Gay Men on the Women Who Inspire Them (University of Wisconsin Press, 2009). He teaches writing at the University of Pittsburgh.

Enough

Brandel France de Bravo is the author of two prize-winning poetry collections, Provenance (Washington Writers’ Publishing House, 2008) and Mother, Loose (Accents Publishing, 2015). She is also the coauthor of a parenting book and the editor of a bilingual anthology, Mexican Poetry Today: 20/20 Voices (Shearsman Books, 2010). She holds an MFA from the Warren Wilson low-residency program and a master’s in public health.

The Disquiet of Now

Carol Ann Davis is the author of the poetry collections Psalm (2007) and Atlas Hour (2011), both from Tupelo Press. An NEA Fellow in poetry and a finalist for the National Magazine Award for work in our pages, she has an essay collection (The Nail in the Tree: Essays on Art, Violence, and Parenting) coming out in 2019, also from Tupelo. A professor of English at Fairfield University, Davis lives in Newtown, Connecticut, with her husband and two sons. 

She Did Not Speak

Wir sagen uns Dunkles
                       —Paul Celan

 

It began so quietly that no one could hear it.

How to begin a story that can never be told? For a long time, I started to tell the story by not telling …

Leslie Morris is a professor of German at the University of Minnesota, where she also serves as director of the Center for Jewish Studies. She is the author, most recently, of The Translated Jew: German Jewish Culture outside the Margins (Northwestern University Press, 2018). Currently she is writing a hybrid memoir.

Can I Tell You Something Funny?—An Interview with George Singleton

William Walsh is the author of seven books. His new collection of poetry, Fly Fishing in Times Square, recently won the Editor’s Prize at Cervena Barva Press. It will be released in September. He is the director of the undergraduate and graduate writing programs at Reinhardt University in Waleska, Georgia. His work has appeared in Rattle, the Kenyon Review, the Valparaiso Poetry Review, Shenandoah, Literary Matters, Five Points, the AWP Chronicle, and elsewhere.

What Anyone Would Feel

Deborah Forbes’s work has appeared in the Hudson Review, Electric Literature, and the Carolina Quarterly. She is a recovering academic and the author of Sincerity’s Shadow: Self-Consciousness in British Romantic and Mid-Twentieth-Century American Poetry (Harvard University Press, 2004). She lives in Clifton, Virginia, with her husband and daughters.

An Escalation

Kelsey Norris is a writer and editor from Alabama currently living in Washington, D.C. She earned an MFA from Vanderbilt University, where she was the editor-in-chief of Nashville Review. Her work has appeared in the Oxford American and the Kenyon Review (online), and she was a finalist in Narrative’s 2017 fall story contest. 

Mi Corazón Es Su Corazón

David Bosworth’s two most recent books, historical studies of cultural change, are The Demise of Virtue in Virtual America: The Moral Origins of the Great Recession (Front Porch Republic, 2014) and Conscientious Thinking: Making Sense in an Age of Idiot Savants (University of Georgia Press, 2017). A resident of Seattle, he is a professor in (and the former director of) the University of Washington’s creative-writing program.