A Dreamlike Song, translated from the Chinese by Michael Day

Zhu Hui was born in Jiangsu, China. He is editor-in-chief of the journal Yu hua and author of four novels and more than eighty short stories. His awards include the Wang Zengqi Award and the 2018 Lu Xun Literary Prize, China’s most prestigious literary award.

The Cities Dissolve, and the Earth Is a Cart

Aya Osuga A. was born in Japan and raised in Los Angeles. She received a degree in computer science from Yale University while also completing coursework in fiction writing. Her work has appeared in McSweeney’s and Michigan Quarterly Review and was awarded a Lawrence Foundation Prize in 2020. After a decade in finance, she relocated to a Panamanian beach town, where she runs a small school and resides with her husband and children.

Orange Crane

Kazim Ali’s books encompass multiple genres, including poetry, fiction, essay, memoir, and translation. He is currently a professor of comparative literature and creative writing at the University of California, San Diego. His newest books are a volume of three long poems titled The Voice of Sheila Chandra (Alice James Books, 2020) and a nonfiction book, Northern Light: Power, Land, and the Memory of Water (Milkweed Editions, 2021).

My Mother’s Gowns

Debra Nystrom has published four books of poems, Night Sky Frequencies (Sheep Meadow Press, 2016); Bad River Road (2009) and Torn Sky (2003), both from Sarabande Books; and A Quarter Turn (Sheep Meadow Press, 1991). Her poetry, fiction, and nonfiction have appeared in The New Yorker, Ploughshares, The Kenyon Review, Slate, The American Poetry Review, Narrative, Conjunctions, and Yale Review, among others. She teaches in the MFA program in creative writing at the University of Virginia.

Itō Grows Ill, A Bird Transforms into a Blossom, and The Giant Trees Stay Unchanged, translated from the Japanese by Jeffrey Angles

Hiromi Itō emerged in the 1980s as the leading voice of Japanese women’s poetry with a series of works depicting women’s psychology, sexuality, and motherhood in dramatic new ways. In the late 1990s, she relocated to California, and since then, she has written a number of award-winning books about migrancy, relocation, identity, aging, and death. Jeffrey Angles has translated her early poetry in Killing Kanoko / Wild Grass on the Riverbank (Tilted Axis Press, 2019) and her semifictional work The Thorn-Puller (Stone Bridge Press, forthcoming in 2022) about her transpacific, bicultural life.

Is It July? & Is It August?, translated from the Japanese by Eric E. Hyett and Spencer Thurlow

Toshiko Hirata, one of Japan’s best-known contemporary poets, has published ten volumes of poetry; she also writes novels, plays, and essays. Her collection Shinanoka (Tokyo, Shichōsha, 2004), which translators Eric E. Hyett and Spencer Thurlow call Is It Poetry?, earned Ms. Hirata the Hagiwara Sakutarō Prize for poetry.

Introduction

Jeffrey Angles is an award-winning translator and poet. His poetry collection written in Japanese, Watashi no hizukehenkōsen (My International Date Line, Shichōsha, 2016), won one of Japan’s most prestigious literary awards, the Yomiuri Prize for Literature, a rare honor accorded only a few non-native speakers since its inception in 1949. He has translated dozens of Japanese writers, focusing on socially engaged, feminist, or queer writers. These include three volumes by the Japanese-born American poet Hiromi Itō: Killing Kanoko (Action Books, 2009), Wild Grass on the Riverbank (Action Books, 2014), and The Thorn-Puller (Stone Bridge Press, forthcoming in 2022).

The Georgia Review Census Sampler

CENSUS SAMPLER

CENSUS SAMPLER

 …

Letter of Recommendation; Bookending the Day; The Listener; & Ghazal of Air

 

Letter of Recommendation

 

I am writing on behalf of the wind in my son’s hair,
which, at least in this photograph, is always there for him,
always cooling his cheeks and suggesting new scents
from over yon dale, …

Matthew Nienow is the author of House of Water (Alice James Books, 2016). His poems have appeared in Poetry, New England Review, TriQuarterly, and many other magazines and anthologies. A former Ruth Lilly Poetry Fellow, he has also received fellowships and awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, the Elizabeth George Foundation, and Artist Trust. He lives in Port Townsend, Washington, with his wife and sons, where he works as a builder of wooden boats and other watercraft.