Littoral

Taije Silverman’s recent poems have been in the 2016 and 2017 editions of Best American Poetry, the 2017 Pushcart Prize anthology, Ploughshares, the Sewanee Review, and the Southern Review. Her first book, Houses Are Fields (2009), was published by Louisiana State University Press, and her translations of the Italian poet Giovanni Pascoli will be out from Princeton University Press in 2019.

We Could See

Derek Sheffield’s poetry collection Through the Second Skin (Orchises Press, 2013) was a finalist for the Washington State Book Award. His work has also appeared recently in the Gettysburg Review, the Southern Review, and AGNI. He lives with his family on the east slopes of the Cascades and is the poetry editor of Terrain.org.

Apocalypse with Crumbs

Kien Lam is a Kundiman Fellow, 2017 Best New Poet, and Indiana University MFA alumnus. His poetry has appeared or is forthcoming in the American Poetry Review, The Nation, the Kenyon Review, Ploughshares, and elsewhere. He lives in Los Angeles, where he writes about esports.

Sideways with Saint Peter

T. S. Dillon lives on a small cattle farm in North Alabama with his wife and two daughters. His work has appeared in the Kenyon Review, Carolina Quarterly, and Nashville Review. He holds an MDiv from Vanderbilt University and an MFA from Spalding University in Louisville, KY.

Toba Khedoori’s Untitled (Table and Chair) (1999)

Yxta Maya Murray is a writer and law professor living in Los Angeles. Her seventh novel is forthcoming in 2021 from Northwestern University Press, and her first collection of short fiction will be published by University of Nevada Press.

The Remembered Past in a Changing World

Lauret Savoy works to unearth what is buried and to re-member what is fragmented, shattered, eroded. A woman of African American, Euro-American, and Native American heritage, she writes about this country’s origins and their varied places in our storytelling. She has written and edited many books, including Trace: Memory, History, Race, and the American Landscape (Counterpoint Press, 2015), which won the 2016 American Book Award from the Before Columbus Foundation; The Colors of Nature: Culture, Identity and the Natural World (Milkweed Editions, 2002); and Bedrock: Writers on the Wonders of Geology (Trinity University Press, 2006). Savoy is the David B. Truman Professor of Environmental Studies and Geology at Mount Holyoke College, a photographer, and a pilot. Winner of an Andrew Carnegie Fellowship, she has also held fellowships from the Smithsonian Institution and Yale University.

Remorse

Dawne Shand grew up in Alabama’s Black Belt and attended Selma’s public schools during their first two decades of integration. Since then, she has lived and worked in Nice, London, and Boston. Her work has appeared in the Kenyon Review and Southern Cultures.

Darwin and Dickinson among the Heliotropes

Anne Goldman’s fiction and nonfiction have appeared in Tin House, the Guardian, The Georgia Review, the Gettysburg Review, and the Southwest Review, among other venues. Her essays have been named as notable in Best American Essays, Best American Science and Nature Writing, and the Best American Travel Writing. Nominated for a National Magazine Award, she is the recipient of fellowships from the Ahmanson/Getty Foundation and grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Woodrow Wilson Foundation. Goldman is Professor of English at Sonoma State University. She is at work upon a second nonfiction manuscript, “An Aria for Insects and Other Essays.”

Coal, Natural Gas, “Other Material,” and Whiskey: Hydrofracturing Country, USA

Jason Molesky is a doctoral student in American literature at Princeton University. He earned his MFA at the University of Mississippi, where he was a John and Renee Grisham Fellow in creative writing. He has worked as a coal miner, a forklift operator, a security contractor, and a brain injury outreach coordinator, and has been a resident fellow at the Blue Mountain Center. Molesky lives with his partner in Lawrenceville, NJ.