on Real and Imagined Worlds: The Novel and Social Science by Morroe Berger

on Life in the English Country House: A Social and Architectural History by Mark Girouard; & The Work of Robert Adam by Geoffrey Beard

The Stage Irishman as Academic (on The Irish Renaissance by Richard Fallis; The Celts: The People Who Came Out of the Darkness by Gerhard Herm; A Flann O’Brien Reader by Stephen Jones; & Celtic Heritage: Ancient Tradition in Ireland and Wales by Alwyn Rees, Brinley Rees)

Woman’s Work (on The Remembered Gate: Origins of American Feminism by Barbara J. Berg; The Lowell Offering: Writings by New England Mill Women (1840-1845) by Benita Eisler; The Factory Girls by Philip S. Foner; & Work by Louisa May Alcott, Sarah Elbert)

Roll, Presses, Roll: Recent Works on Black History (on Slave Testimony: Two Centuries of Letters, Speeches, Interviews, and Autobiographies by John W. Blassingame; This Species of Property: Slave Life and Culture in the Old South by Leslie Howard Owens; & They Came Before Columbus: The African Presence in Ancient America by Ivan Van Sertima)

The Colonial South Rediscovered (on Intellectual Life in the Colonial South 1585-1763. 3 volumes by Richard Beale Davis)

Cutting Beetle-Blighted Ponderosa Pine

The Tragic Vision of The Possessed

Joyce Carol Oates is the author of some one hundred books in multiple genres, including the novel Little Bird of Heaven (2009), the story collection Sourland (2010), and the memoir A Widow’s Story (2011), all from Ecco. The 2010 recipient of the Ivan Sandrof Award for Lifetime Achievement of the National Book Critics Circle, Oates is the Roger S. Berlind Distinguished Professor of the Humanities at Princeton University, where she has taught since 1978. Oates’s “Ballerina” appeared in our fortieth-anniversary retrospective (Spring 1986).

Animals Who Remember