Rebellions of the Body, Creations of the Mind

Fourteen doctors puzzled over my symptoms before a fifteenth finally presented the results of an eight-hundred-dollar allergy test explaining my seven years of debilitating digestive issues. I stopped eating everything on the list—basil, oranges, raspberries, artichokes, asparagus, mustard, melon, oregano, …

J. D. Ho has an MFA from the Michener Center at the University of Texas at Austin. Ho’s poems and essays have appeared in North American Review, Ninth Letter, Crab Orchard Review, and other journals.

Darwin and Dickinson among the Heliotropes

Anne Goldman’s fiction and nonfiction have appeared in Tin House, the Guardian, The Georgia Review, the Gettysburg Review, and the Southwest Review, among other venues. Her essays have been named as notable in Best American Essays, Best American Science and Nature Writing, and the Best American Travel Writing. Nominated for a National Magazine Award, she is the recipient of fellowships from the Ahmanson/Getty Foundation and grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Woodrow Wilson Foundation. Goldman is Professor of English at Sonoma State University. She is at work upon a second nonfiction manuscript, “An Aria for Insects and Other Essays.”

Coal, Natural Gas, “Other Material,” and Whiskey: Hydrofracturing Country, USA

Jason Molesky is a doctoral student in American literature at Princeton University. He earned his MFA at the University of Mississippi, where he was a John and Renee Grisham Fellow in creative writing. He has worked as a coal miner, a forklift operator, a security contractor, and a brain injury outreach coordinator, and has been a resident fellow at the Blue Mountain Center. Molesky lives with his partner in Lawrenceville, NJ.

Commensals: Theme and Variations

Susanne Paola Antonetta’s Make Me a Mother, ranked a Top Ten Book of the Year by Image Journal, was published by W. W. Norton (2014). She is also the author of Curious Atoms: A History with Physics (Essay Press, 2016), and five poetry collections, most recently Stolen Moments (Shebooks, 2013). Her works have been New York Times Notable Books and an Oprah Bookshelf pick, and she has earned honors that include an American Book Award and a Pushcart Prize. She lives in Bellingham, Washington, and is the editor-in-chief of the Bellingham Review.

3-D

Thomas Allen’s photographs have appeared in numerous magazines (including Harper’s) and on the covers of three James Ellroy novels, as well as in Uncovered: Photographs by Thomas Allen (Aperture, 2007). His work has been exhibited at the Foley Gallery in New York and Thomas Barry Fine Arts in Minneapolis, among many other galleries. He has a BFA from Wayne State University and an MFA from the University of Minnesota.

on full-metal indigiqueer by Joshua Whitehead

Shanae Aurora Martínez is an assistant professor of English specializing in Indigenous literatures at California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo. She holds degrees from the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee and the University of California at Davis. She has served as an editor and labor organizer, and her work can be found in Studies in American Indian Literatures, The Georgia Review, and Cream City Review.

on Dear All by Maggie Anderson

Susan Shaw Sailer lives in West Virginia. She has published two books, Ship of Light (Port Yonder Press, 2013) and The God of Roundabouts (WordTech Communications, 2016), as well as a chapbook, Coal (Finishing Line Press, 2012). Her poems have appeared in such journals as Main Street Rag and Pittsburgh Poetry Review.

on Invocation to Daughters by Barbara Jane Reyes

Jeremy Allan Hawkins has received a grant from the U.S. Fulbright Program and a fellowship from the Alabama Prison Arts and Education Project. He is the author of A Clean Edge, winner of the 2016 BOAAT Chapbook Prize. His poetry has been selected for the 2016 Best New Poets anthology, and his work appeared in the Time Space Existence exhibition at the 2018 Venice Biennale of Architecture. He lives in France.

What I Asked

Keith Ratzlaff teaches poetry and literature at Central College in Pella, Iowa. His most recent books of poetry, Then, A Thousand Crows (2009) and Dubious Angels: Poems after Paul Klee (2005), are from Anhinga Press, as will be his next, Who’s Asking? His poems and reviews have appeared recently in the Cincinnati Review, Arts and Letters, Colorado Review, and the American Reader; his honors include the Theodore Roethke Award, two Pushcart Prizes, and inclusion in The Best American Poetry 2009.