She Did Not Speak

Wir sagen uns Dunkles
                       —Paul Celan

 

It began so quietly that no one could hear it.

How to begin a story that can never be told? For a long time, I started to tell the story by not telling …

Leslie Morris is a professor of German at the University of Minnesota, where she also serves as director of the Center for Jewish Studies. She is the author, most recently, of The Translated Jew: German Jewish Culture outside the Margins (Northwestern University Press, 2018). Currently she is writing a hybrid memoir.

Can I Tell You Something Funny?—An Interview with George Singleton

William Walsh is the author of seven books. His new collection of poetry, Fly Fishing in Times Square, recently won the Editor’s Prize at Cervena Barva Press. It will be released in September. He is the director of the undergraduate and graduate writing programs at Reinhardt University in Waleska, Georgia. His work has appeared in Rattle, the Kenyon Review, the Valparaiso Poetry Review, Shenandoah, Literary Matters, Five Points, the AWP Chronicle, and elsewhere.

What Anyone Would Feel

Deborah Forbes’s work has appeared in the Hudson Review, Electric Literature, and the Carolina Quarterly. She is a recovering academic and the author of Sincerity’s Shadow: Self-Consciousness in British Romantic and Mid-Twentieth-Century American Poetry (Harvard University Press, 2004). She lives in Clifton, Virginia, with her husband and daughters.

An Escalation

Kelsey Norris is a writer and editor from Alabama currently living in Washington, D.C. She earned an MFA from Vanderbilt University, where she was the editor-in-chief of Nashville Review. Her work has appeared in the Oxford American and the Kenyon Review (online), and she was a finalist in Narrative’s 2017 fall story contest. 

Mi Corazón Es Su Corazón

David Bosworth’s two most recent books, historical studies of cultural change, are The Demise of Virtue in Virtual America: The Moral Origins of the Great Recession (Front Porch Republic, 2014) and Conscientious Thinking: Making Sense in an Age of Idiot Savants (University of Georgia Press, 2017). A resident of Seattle, he is a professor in (and the former director of) the University of Washington’s creative-writing program.

on The Dean of Discipline by Michael Waters

Judith Vollmer’s fifth book of poetry, The Apollonia Poems (University of Wisconsin Press, 2017), was the winner of the Four Lakes Prize in Poetry. Her poems, essays, and reviews have appeared in Poetry International, the Women’s Review of Books, the Great River Review, The Cambridge Companion to Baudelaire, and elsewhere. She lives in Pittsburgh.

on Quickening Fields by Pattiann Rogers

Tina Kelley’s third poetry collection, Abloom and Awry (CavanKerry Press, 2017), followed Precise (Word Press, 2013) and The Gospel of Galore (Word Poetry, 2002), winner of a 2003 Washington State Book Award. She coauthored Almost Home: Helping Kids Move from Homelessness to Hope (Wiley, 2012) and reported for the New York Times for ten years, sharing there in a staff Pulitzer Prize. She lives with her husband and two children in Maplewood, NJ.

A Fire & Prayer from the Desert

Gary Gildner has contributed to The Georgia Review numerous poems and stories, four essays, a book review, and an exchange of letters with the late novelist Raymond Andrews. His latest collection of poems is Cleaning a Rainbow (BkMk Press, 2007); his latest collection of stories is The Capital of Kansas City (BkMk Press, 2016). He has received Pushcart Prizes in fiction and nonfiction, and the Iowa Poetry Prize for The Bunker in the Parsley Fields (University of Iowa Press). Gildner and his wife Michele live in the Clearwater Mountains of Idaho and in the foothills of Arizona’s Santa Catalina Mountains.

The Quarry

Corey Van Landingham is the author of Love Letter to Who Owns the Heavens, forthcoming from Tupelo Press, and Antidote (2013), winner of the 2012 Ohio State University Press/The Journal Award in Poetry. Recipient of an NEA Fellowship and a Stegner Fellowship from Stanford University, she has published work in The Best American Poetry, Boston Review, The New Yorker, and elsewhere. She lives in Ohio and is a book review editor for the Kenyon Review.