To Our Readers: A Postscript

In this Fall 2019 issue of The Georgia Review, the last with which I will be involved, Anne Wright’s essay “On the Farm”—about her late husband, James Wright (1928–1980), and his important involvement with fellow poet Robert Bly—opens with …

Stephen Corey joined the staff of The Georgia Review in 1983 as assistant editor and subsequently served as associate editor, acting editor, and, from 2008 to his retirement in 2019, editor. His most recent book is Startled at the Big Sound: Essays Personal, Literary, and Cultural (Mercer University Press, 2017); he has also published nine collections of poems, among them There Is No Finished World (White Pine Press) and Synchronized Swimming (Livingston Press); his individual poems, essays, and reviews have appeared in dozens of periodicals; and he has coedited three books in as many genres, including (with Warren Slesinger) Spreading the Word: Editors on Poetry (The Bench Press). In the spring of 2022, White Pine Press will bring out his As My Age Then Was, So I Understood Them: New and Selected Poems.

on Look at the Lake by Kevin Brophy

Marianne Boruch’s ten poetry collections include the recent title The Anti-Grief (Copper Canyon Press, 2019). She was a Fulbright Senior Scholar in Australia last year at the University of Canberra’s International Poetry Studies Institute, observing the astonishing wildlife to write a book-length sequence, a neo-ancient/medieval bestiary, which is forthcoming from Copper Canyon. The poems in this issue are a part of that collection.

on Tokyo by Michael Mejia

Tim Horvath is the author of Understories (Bellevue Literary Press, 2012), which won the New Hampshire Literary Award, and Circulation (sunnyoutside press, 2009), and his fiction appears in ConjunctionsAGNIHarvard Review, and elsewhere. He teaches creative writing at the New Hampshire Institute of Art in Manchester, New Hampshire, and in the Cambridge Writers’ Workshop’s program in Granada, Spain. He is currently working on a novel about contemporary composers and musicians.

Vexed Heritage: Two Southern Poets (on R. T. Smith’s Summoning Shades and Natasha Trethewey’s Monument: Poems New and Selected )

Floyd Collins earned his MFA and PhD at the University of Arkansas. A book of critical essays on poetry, The Living Artifact, is forthcoming from Stephen F. Austin University Press in spring 2021. The Teresa Poems will appear from Somondoco Press in fall 2021. His poetry and critical prose appear regularly with The Arkansas Review, The Georgia Review, The Gettysburg Review, and The Kenyon Review.

Bodies, Political and Religious (on Leonard Cohen’s The Flame: Poems Notebooks Lyrics Drawings; Marilyn Chin’s A Portrait of the Self as Nation: New and Selected Poems; Kazim Ali’s Inquisition; Del Samatar and Sofia Samatar’s Monster Portraits; and Li-Young Lee’s The Undressing)

Jeff Gundy’s eighth book of poems, Without a Plea, was published in early 2019 by Bottom Dog Press. Recent poems and essays are in Cincinnati Review, River Teeth, Forklift, Ohio, Terrain, and Christian Century. He is at work on a series of lyric essays about the Illinois prairie with the working title “Wind Farm.”

 

Becoming Ariel

Valerie Nieman’s fourth novel, To the Bones, appeared this spring from West Virginia University Press. Her third poetry collection, Leopard Lady: A Life in Verse (Press 53, 2018), includes work that first appeared in the Missouri Review, Chautauqua, Southern Poetry Review, and other journals. Other poems have been published in numerous anthologies, including Eyes Glowing at the Edge of the Woods and Ghost Fishing: An Eco-Justice Poetry Anthology. Nieman teaches creative writing at North Carolina A&T State University.

God Is Not Right, He Is Big & Notes Toward Intuitive Geography

Jeff Gundy’s eighth book of poems, Without a Plea, was published in early 2019 by Bottom Dog Press. Recent poems and essays are in Cincinnati Review, River Teeth, Forklift, Ohio, Terrain, and Christian Century. He is at work on a series of lyric essays about the Illinois prairie with the working title “Wind Farm.”

 

Seahorse in the Desert; The Scorpion of Loud; & Industralia

Alberto Ríos’s latest collections of poems are A Small Story About the Sky (2015), The Dangerous Shirt (2009), and The Theater of Night (2007)—this last the winner of the PEN/Beyond Margins Award, and all three from Copper Canyon Press. A finalist for the National Book Award in 2002 for The Smallest Muscle in the Human Body and the recipient of the Western Literature Association Distinguished Achievement Award, Ríos has taught at Arizona State University for over thirty-five years. He is Arizona’s inaugural poet laureate, a chancellor of the Academy of American Poets, and director of the Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing at ASU.

Seeing God; The Watcher; & Headlong

Lola Haskins’s latest collection of poems, her fifteenth, is Asylum: Improvisations on John Clare (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2019).

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