Let’s Say

Stephen Dunn is the author of numerous books of poetry and prose. His Degrees of Fidelity: Essays on Poetry and the Latitudes of the Personal,  is due out from Tiger Bark Press in October 2018, and a new collection of poems, Pagan Virtues, is scheduled to be published by W. W. Norton in 2019. He has been the recipient of many awards, including the 2001 Pulitzer Prize in Poetry for Different Hours, and he has had fellowships from the Guggenheim and Rockefeller foundations. Dunn lives in Frostburg, Maryland, with his wife, the writer Barbara Hurd.

Portrait of Poet in Stroller and Awe; From the Book of Accounts; & High Country, First Night

Alice Friman’s seventh collection of poetry is Blood Weather, forthcoming from Louisiana State University Press in 2019. She’s the winner of a Pushcart Prize and is included in Best American Poetry. New work is forthcoming in PloughsharesPlume, Shenandoah, Western Humanities Review, and others. She lives in Milledgeville, Georgia, where she was poet-in-residence at Georgia College and State University.

On Mother’s Suicide

Mary B. Moore has poems forthcoming in Poem/Memoir/Story, Unsplendid, Atlanta Review, and the anthology Eyes Glowing at the Edge of the Woods: Fiction and Poetry from West Virginia (West Virginia University Press). Her full-length collections are The Book of Snow (1998) and Flicker (2016)the latter the winner of the Dogfish Head Poetry Award.  

A Brutal Faith

Gerard Beirne has published six books of fiction and poetry. He has been shortlisted three times for awards in fiction: this year for the BGE Irish Book Awards Short Story of the Year Award; in 2015 for the Danuta Gleed Literary Award for his collection of stories In a Time of Drought and Hunger (Oberon Press, 2014); and in 2004 for the Kerry Group Irish Fiction Award for his 2003 novel The Eskimo in the Net. 

Wig Violence

As of yesterday, there is a woman on the run: Eudoxie Gilmore, 32, a lifetime resident of Cape Jasmine who up until recently had worked at the Peoples Funeral Home as hairdresser to the deceased. Eudoxie specialized in finger waves, …

Selena Anderson’s stories have appeared in Glimmer Train, Kenyon Review, Joyland, AGNI, and Best of Gigantic. Originally from Pearland, Texas, Anderson completed her MFA at Columbia University, where she won the 2007 Transatlantic/Henfield Prize. She is working on a collection of stories. 

Linguistic Fallacies and Facial Tics, Sex Ed and Death

A month after my parents rightly feared unlawful and inferable retribution—maybe twenty-seven days after my Uncle Cush arrived, insisting that we move to his abode on the other side of the Savannah River nuclear facility, for he foresaw arson, which …

George Singleton has published over three hundred stories in literary journals and magazines such as The Georgia Review, the Atlantic Monthly, Harper’s Magazine, One Story, the Southern Review, and Zoetrope. His eighth collection, Staff Picks, will be available in March 2019 from Yellow Shoe Fiction. A Guggenheim Fellow and a member of the Fellowship of Southern Writers, Singleton teaches in the English department at Wofford College in Spartanburg, South Carolina.

On This Day You Are All Your Ages

Jack Driscoll’s latest collection, The Goat Fish and the Lover’s Knot (Wayne State University Press, 2017), received the 2018 Michigan Library Foundation Award for fiction. His forthcoming “New & Selected” will include eleven stories previously published in The Georgia Review and dating back to 1987. He currently teaches in Pacific University’s low-residency MFA program in Oregon.

from If & When

Marvin Bell’s recent books include Vertigo: The Living Dead Man Poems (Copper Canyon Press, 2013 )and Whiteout (Lodima Press, 2011), a collaboration with photographer Nathan Lyons. The selections from “If & When” in this issue continue Bell’s poetic correspondence with Christopher Merrill, earlier exchanges from which were collected in After the Fact: Scripts & Postscripts (White Pine Press, 2016).

Christopher Merrill has six poetry collections; many works of translation and edited volumes, among them The Forgotten Language: Contemporary Poets and Nature (1991) and From the Faraway Nearby: Georgia O’Keeffe as Icon (1993, reissued 1998); and six books of nonfiction, most recently Self-Portrait with Dogwood (Trinity University Press, 2017). His work has been translated into nearly forty languages and his honors include a knighthood in arts and letters from the French government. As director of the University of Iowa’s International Writing Program, he has undertaken cultural diplomacy missions to more than fifty countries.

How to Fix a Broken Heart, or The True Artist Helps the World by Revealing Mystic Truths

Rebecca Emlinger Roberts’ essays, short stories, and poems have appeared in numerous literary journals, including the Massachusetts Review, the Antioch Review, and (three times previously) the Georgia Review. One of her GR essays, “The Art of Looking Down” (Fall 2008), was listed as a notable essay in the 2009 edition of Best American Essays.