Autumn, Sleeping Bear Dunes

Mary Broadbeck, originally trained in industrial design, worked in the West Michigan furniture industry for a dozen years—she is listed as inventor on several U.S. furniture-related patents—before shifting to image-making in the 1990s. She holds a BFA in industrial design from Michigan State University and an MFA in printmaking from Western Michigan University, and she studied Japanese woodblock printmaking in Tokyo with Yoshisuke Funasaka on a Japanese government Bunka-Cho Fellowship in 1998. Her landscape woodblock prints—most of which depict the Great Lakes—have received critical acclaim in both Japan and the United States; the Sleeping Bear Dunes series, created 2006–2008, is in the permanent collection at the Detroit Institute of Arts and in many private collections throughout the world. Brodbeck teaches the traditional methods of Japanese woodblock printing through public workshops, college and university courses, and private lessons, and she is currently making a documentary film about the process. A Michigan native, she lives in Kalamazoo.

Let’s Ask the Fox

Laurie Kutchins’ three books of poetry include The Night Path (BOA Editions, 1997), which received the Isabella Gardner Award. Her poems and lyric essays have appeared previously in The Georgia Review, Southern Review, Orion, the New Yorker, and elsewhere. She directs the creative writing program at James Madison University.

on A Woman of Property by Robyn Schiff

Catherine Rogers teaches English at Savannah State University. Her work has appeared in Kalliope: A Journal of Women’s Art, Paideuma, and Women’s Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal, as well as in the online journals Autumn Sky Poetry and Touch: The Journal of Healing. She cherishes happy memories of having been the very first graduate editorial assistant of The Georgia Review.

on The Great Clod: Notes and Memoirs on Nature and History in East Asia by Gary Snyder

Justin Wadland is the author of Trying Home: The Rise and Fall of an Anarchist Utopia on Puget Sound (Oregon State University Press, 2014), which won the 2015 Washington State Book Award in the History/General Nonfiction category. His essays and reviews have appeared in the Believer, the Normal School, Los Angeles Review of Books, and Rain Taxi, among other publications. He works as a librarian and lives with his family in Tacoma, Washington.

The Uneventful: On Eduardo Costa and Conceptual Poetics (on Conceptualism and Other Fictions: The Collected Writings of Eduardo Costa 1965–2015, edited by Patrick Greaney; & Corrected Slogans: Reading and Writing Conceptualism, edited by Lucy Ives)

Alex McElroy’s writing appears or is forthcoming in New England Review, Copper Nickel, Kenyon Review Online, Black Warrior Review, and Catapult. He splits his time between New Hampshire and Texas.

Soldania (on Paul Ruffin’s The Time the Waters Rose & Stories of the Gulf Coast; Sonja Livingston’s Ladies Night at the Dreamland; Gilbert Allen’s The Final Days of Great American Shopping: Stories Past, Present, and Future; John Lane’s Coyote Settles the South; & Becoming Southern Writers: Essays in Honor of Charles Joyner, edited by Orville Vernon Burton and Eldred E. Prince Jr.)

Samuel Pickering, the author of more thirty books, which span several genres, was born and raised in Nashville, Tennessee. He taught English for forty-five years, thirty-five of them at the University of Connecticut. His most recent book is Parade’s End, published by Mercer University Press in 2018. “Reading Pickering,” a reviewer wrote in the Smithsonian decades ago, “is like taking a walk with your oldest, wittiest friend.”

Jacquard

Michael Waters’s recent and forthcoming books include The Dean of Discipline (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2018), Celestial Joyride (BOA Editions, 2016), and a coedited anthology, Reel Verse: Poems about the Movies (Knopf, 2019). A 2017 Guggenheim Fellow, Waters teaches at Monmouth University and for the Drew University MFA program. He is also the recipient of five Pushcart Prizes and fellowships from the NEA, the Fulbright Foundation, and the New Jersey State Council on the Arts.

Altar

Lola Haskins’s latest collection of poems, her fifteenth, is Asylum: Improvisations on John Clare (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2019).

Letter to Inmate #271847, Convicted of Murder, 1985

Natasha Trethewey served two terms as Poet Laureate of the United States (2012–2014). She is the author of four collections of poetry: Thrall (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2012), Native Guard (2006)—for which she was awarded the 2007 Pulitzer Prize—Bellocq’s Ophelia (2002), and Domestic Work (2000). Her book of nonfiction, Beyond Katrina: A Meditation on the Mississippi Gulf Coast, appeared in 2010 from the University of Georgia Press. She is the recipient of fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the NEA, the Rockefeller Foundation, the Beinecke Library at Yale, and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard. A fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Trethewey is Robert W. Woodruff Professor of English and Creative Writing at Emory University.