West of Flat Rock

Lee Martin, who teaches in the MFA program at Ohio State University, is the author of five novels, including the Pulitzer Prize finalist The Bright Forever (Shaye Areheart Books, 2005). His most recent book is a story collection, The Mutual UFO Network (Dzanc Books, 2018).

Why If and Why When?—An Interview with Marvin Bell and Christopher Merrill Concerning Their Correspondence-in-Paragraphs

Stephen Corey joined the staff of The Georgia Review in 1983 as assistant editor and subsequently served as associate editor, acting editor, and, from 2008 to his retirement in 2019, editor. His most recent book is Startled at the Big Sound: Essays Personal, Literary, and Cultural (Mercer University Press, 2017); he has also published nine collections of poems, among them There Is No Finished World (White Pine Press) and Synchronized Swimming (Livingston Press); his individual poems, essays, and reviews have appeared in dozens of periodicals; and he has coedited three books in as many genres, including (with Warren Slesinger) Spreading the Word: Editors on Poetry (The Bench Press). In the spring of 2022, White Pine Press will bring out his As My Age Then Was, So I Understood Them: New and Selected Poems.

Hints of Insurrection: a Conversation with Stephen Dunn

INTRODUCTION

Stephen Dunn is the author of seventeen collections of poetry, two volumes of essays, and three chapbooks; his poems have appeared in Poetry, the Atlantic, the Nation, the New Yorker, American Poetry Review, the New Republic

Helena Feder is Associate Professor of Literature and Environment and Director of Great Books at East Carolina University. She is the author of a number of scholarly articles and one book, Ecocriticism and the Idea of Culture: Biology and the Bildungsroman (Routledge, 2014). She has published poems in North American Review and ISLE, and interviews in North American ReviewGreen Letters, Radical Philosophy, ISLE, and Capitalism, Nature, Socialism.

On Not Reviewing Joan Didion’s South and West: From a Notebook

Sebastian Matthews is the author of a memoir, In My Father’s Footsteps (W. W. Norton, 2004), and two books of poetry, We Generous (2007) and Miracle Day: Mid-Life Songs (2012), both from Red Hen Press. His new hybrid collection of poetry and prose from Red Hen, Beginner’s Guide to a Head-on Collision (2017), won the Independent Publishers Book Award’s silver medal.

“feeling it trying to feel it through”: Politicized Solitudes in Adrienne Rich’s Later Work

Ed Pavlić has published eleven books. His forthcoming and most recent works are Let It Be Broke (Four Way Books, 2020), Another Kind of Madness: A Novel (Milkweed Editions, 2019), Live at the Bitter End (Saturnalia, 2018), and Who Can Afford to Improvise?: James Baldwin and Black Music, the Lyric and the Listener (Fordham University Press, 2016). He is Distinguished Research Professor in the English department, and in the Institute for African American Studies, at the University of Georgia.

from “If & When”

Marvin Bell’s recent books include Vertigo: The Living Dead Man Poems (Copper Canyon Press, 2013 )and Whiteout (Lodima Press, 2011), a collaboration with photographer Nathan Lyons. The selections from “If & When” in this issue continue Bell’s poetic correspondence with Christopher Merrill, earlier exchanges from which were collected in After the Fact: Scripts & Postscripts (White Pine Press, 2016).

Christopher Merrill has six poetry collections; many works of translation and edited volumes, among them The Forgotten Language: Contemporary Poets and Nature (1991) and From the Faraway Nearby: Georgia O’Keeffe as Icon (1993, reissued 1998); and six books of nonfiction, most recently Self-Portrait with Dogwood (Trinity University Press, 2017). His work has been translated into nearly forty languages and his honors include a knighthood in arts and letters from the French government. As director of the University of Iowa’s International Writing Program, he has undertaken cultural diplomacy missions to more than fifty countries.

Pocketable Breviaries: The Very Short Poem

Jane Hirshfield’s most recent books are The Beauty (Knopf, 2015), longlisted for the National Book Award in Poetry, and Ten Windows: How Great Poems Transform the World (Knopf, 2015), winner of the Northern California Book Award. A chancellor emerita of the Academy of American Poets, Hirshfield has had work in the New Yorker, the Atlantic, the Times Literary Supplement, the New York Review of Books, and eight editions of The Best American Poetry.

on I Wrote This Book Because I Love You by Tim Kreider

Maura Mandyck, several of whose reviews have appeared previously in our pages, holds degrees in English from the University of Notre Dame and the University of Georgia, and in library science from the University of Alabama. She has worked as a librarian for the Nashville Public Library and for Athens Academy, and is now an instructional librarian at Spring Hill College, where she also teaches in the English department. She lives in Mobile, Alabama, with three dogs, two cats, and lots and lots of books.

on What Is Poetry? (Just Kidding, I Know You Know): Interviews from The Poetry Project Newsletter (1983–2009), edited by Anselm Berrigan

Nick Sturm’s poems, collaborations, and essays have appeared or are forthcoming in The Brooklyn RailASAP/JBlack Warrior Review, the websites of the Poetry Foundation and PEN America, The Best American Nonrequired Reading, and elsewhere. His first book of poems is How We Light (H_NGM_N BKS, 2013). His scholarly and archival work can be traced at his blog, Crystal Set. He is a Marion L. Brittain Postdoctoral Fellow at the Georgia Institute of Technology, where he teaches courses on poetry, visual art, and multimodal composition.