Moon, Razor, Eye

Not-Knowing

Everyday Places

Groundwork; The Fashion Designer; & The Art of Starving

Something Good for Ginnie

Mary Hood, 2014 inductee to the Georgia Writers Hall of Fame, is the author of the novel Familiar Heat (1995) and the short-story collections And Venus Is Blue (1986) and How Far She Went (1984). A new collection of stories, A Clear View of the Southern Sky, is forthcoming from the University of South Carolina Press in 2015.

on Encounters With Chinese Writers by Annie Dillard

on You Know What Is Right by Jim Heynen

Stephen Corey joined the staff of The Georgia Review in 1983 as assistant editor and subsequently served as associate editor, acting editor, and, from 2008 to his retirement in 2019, editor. His most recent book is Startled at the Big Sound: Essays Personal, Literary, and Cultural (Mercer University Press, 2017); he has also published nine collections of poems, among them There Is No Finished World (White Pine Press) and Synchronized Swimming (Livingston Press); his individual poems, essays, and reviews have appeared in dozens of periodicals; and he has coedited three books in as many genres, including (with Warren Slesinger) Spreading the Word: Editors on Poetry (The Bench Press). In the spring of 2022, White Pine Press will bring out his As My Age Then Was, So I Understood Them: New and Selected Poems.

on Seeing Earth: Literary Responses To Space Exploration by Ronald Weber

Marianne Boruch’s ten poetry collections include the recent title The Anti-Grief (Copper Canyon Press, 2019). She was a Fulbright Senior Scholar in Australia last year at the University of Canberra’s International Poetry Studies Institute, observing the astonishing wildlife to write a book-length sequence, a neo-ancient/medieval bestiary, which is forthcoming from Copper Canyon. The poems in this issue are a part of that collection.

on The 60s, Without Apology by Sohnya Sayres, Anders Stephanson, Stanley Aronowitz, and Fredric Jameson