Serotonin—The Thirtieth Week of the Year of the Earth Pig; Dopamine; & Year of the Dogs, Year of a Synapse

Duy Doan is the author of We Play a Game (Yale University Press, 2018), winner of the Yale Series of Younger Poets Prize and a Lambda Literary Award. His work has appeared in Poem-a-Day, Poetry, and Slate, and he has been featured in PBS’s Poetry in America, Poetry’s Editors’ Blog, and the Harriet Books Blog. Doan holds an MFA in poetry from Boston University, where he later served as director of the Favorite Poem Project.

Portrait with Unknown Dimensions

HEAR THE AUTHOR READ HIS POEM

 

In Minneapolis, I recently attended an exhibit 
which mourned American soldiers lost in Iraq.
One walk through was enough for me. The artist,

who wrote each dead individual’s name in cursive
on a …

Tarik Dobbs is a writer and artist born in Dearborn, Michigan, whose poetry appears in the Best New Poets and Best of the Net anthologies, as well as in Guernica and Poetry. Dobbs works at poetry.onl and has served as a guest editor for Mizna and Zoeglossia. An incoming MFA fellow in Northwestern University’s Art, Theory, Practice program, Dobbs received an MFA in creative writing from the University of Minnesota in May 2022. 

Tonight, I haven’t even said the word pipeline & Spring

Teresa Dzieglewicz is an educator, poet, and lover of rivers. She is a poet-in-residence with the Chicago Poetry Center and part of the founding team of the Mní Wičhóni Nakíčižiŋ Wóuŋspe. Her first book, Something Small of How to See a River, won Tupelo Press’s Dorset Prize (selected by Tyehimba Jess) and is forthcoming in 2023. She is the recipient of a Pushcart Prize, Auburn Witness Prize, and Palette Poetry Prize and has received fellowships from the Elizabeth George Foundation, Community of Writers, and Brooklyn Poets. Her poems appear in Beloit Poetry Journal, Prairie Schooner, Ninth Letter, Sixth Finch, Best New Poets, and elsewhere.

I Kept Thinking Back

Alayna Eagle Shield is Lakȟóta Húŋkpapȟa and Arikara and a citizen of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. A doctoral student in education and a research assistant at the Banks Center for Educational Justice at the University of Washington, Eagle Shield previously worked as the SRST Health Education Director, a Lakota language instructor at the Lakota Language Immersion Nest, and as the Language Specialist for the Standing Rock Language and Culture Institute.

Teresa Dzieglewicz is an educator, poet, and lover of rivers. She is a poet-in-residence with the Chicago Poetry Center and part of the founding team of the Mní Wičhóni Nakíčižiŋ Wóuŋspe. Her first book, Something Small of How to See a River, won Tupelo Press’s Dorset Prize (selected by Tyehimba Jess) and is forthcoming in 2023. She is the recipient of a Pushcart Prize, Auburn Witness Prize, and Palette Poetry Prize and has received fellowships from the Elizabeth George Foundation, Community of Writers, and Brooklyn Poets. Her poems appear in Beloit Poetry Journal, Prairie Schooner, Ninth Letter, Sixth Finch, Best New Poets, and elsewhere.

Chinatown Burning (with an afterword by the author)

Teow Lim Goh’s two poetry collections are Faraway Places (Diode Editions, 2021) and Islanders (Bower House, 2016); her essay collection Western Journeys will be published in 2022 by University of Utah Press. Her essays, poetry, and criticism have been or will be featured in Beloit Poetry Journal, the Los Angeles Review of Books, PBS NewsHour, and The New Yorker.

Neurasthenia & What Is Small Will Not Be Small Forever

Chelsea Dingman’s first book, Thaw (University of Georgia Press, 2017), was chosen by Allison Joseph as the winner of the National Poetry Series; her second collection, Through a Small Ghost (University of Georgia Press, 2020), won the Georgia Poetry Prize. I, Divided, a new collection, is forthcoming from Louisiana State University Press in 2023. She is also the author of the chapbook What Bodies Have I Moved (Madhouse Press, 2018). 

Mullein & This Morning

David Baker’s new book of poems, Whale Fall, will be published in July 2022 by W. W. Norton. Other poems have appeared lately in American Poetry Review, the New York Times, The New Yorker, Poetry, and others. He lives in Granville, Ohio. 

Mob Scene: Belfast 1969; A Lyre for Lyra; & What Place Was I Last Night

Philip Metres is the author of ten books, including Shrapnel Maps (Copper Canyon, 2020), The Sound of Listening: Poetry as Refuge and Resistance (University of Michigan Press, 2018), Pictures at an Exhibition (University of Akron Press, 2016), and Sand Opera (Alice James Books, 2015). His work has garnered a Guggenheim fellowship, a Lannan fellowship, the Adrienne Rich Award, and three Arab American Book Awards, among many other honors. He is a professor of English and director of the Peace, Justice, and Human Rights program at John Carroll University and core faculty at Vermont College of Fine Arts.

Come, child; Transcribing the Letters of William Alexander Bustamante; Searching for Home; A poem is a power; & Poem ascending (with an annotation by Jeffrey Yang)

Pamela Mordecai is a Jamaican-Canadian author who writes poetry, fiction, and plays for children and adults. Her poetry collections are Up Tropic (2021), de book of Mary (Mawenzi House, 2015), Subversive Sonnets (Mawenzi House, 2012), The True Blue of Islands (Sandberry Press, 2005), Certifiable (Goose Lane Editions, 2001), de Man (Sister Vision Press, 1995), and Journey Poem (Sandberry Press, 1989). A Fierce Green Place: New and Selected Poems and de book of Joseph are forthcoming from New Directions Press and Mawenzi House, respectively. Her debut novel, Red Jacket, was shortlisted for the Rogers Writers Trust Award in 2015. In 2020, ECW Press’s Bespeak Audio Editions released her short-story collection Pink Icing (2006) as an audiobook read by Mordecai.

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