Last Words to James Wright

Richard Hugo’s twenty-odd books (two of them posthumous) include The Lady in Kicking Horse Reservoir (1973), The Triggering Town: Lectures and Essays on Poetry and Writing (1979), The Right Madness on Skye (1980), and The Real West Marginal Way: A Poet’s Autobiography (1986). Born in White Center, Washington, on 21 December 1923, Hugo served as a bombardier in the Mediterranean during World War II. When he returned home he enrolled at the University of Washington, where he earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees in creative writing. After working as a technical writer at Boeing for thirteen years, Hugo was hired at the University of Montana, where he taught for almost eighteen years. He died on 22 October 1982, at the age of fifty-eight.

Stitching in Time: Dorothy Ruddick

Monuments

Cutting Beetle-Blighted Ponderosa Pine

Plague Sermon

William Heyen’s Shoah Train: Poems (Etruscan Press, 2004) was a finalist for the National Book Award; Mayapple Press will publish his book-length poem, The Angel Voices, in 2010. A past Senior Fulbright Lecturer in American Literature in Germany, Heyen has been awarded National Endowment for the Arts, Guggenheim, and American Academy of Arts and Letters fellowships, among other prizes and honors. He lives in Brockport, New York.

The Feast of Stephen

The Prejohn

Hunt Hawkins’ poems have appeared in Poetry, Southern Review, TriQuarterly, Beloit Poetry Journal, Poetry Northwest, The Georgia Review, and many other journals. His poetry collection, The Domestic Life (University of Pittsburgh Press, 1994), won the Agnes Lynch Starrett Poetry Prize. He is chair of the English department at the University of South Florida.

The Name of God Is

The Second Violinist’s Son