Coherence Through Place in Contemporary American Poetry (on Relations: Selected Poems 1950-1985 by Philip Booth; Selected Poems by Robert Bly; In These Mountains by Peter Sacks; Collected Poems by Robert Hay Den and Frederick Glaysher; & Thomas and Beulah by Rita Dove)

Language and Pressure (on Self and Sensibility in Contemporary American Poetry by Charles Altieri; Introspection and Contemporary Poetry by Alan Williamson; & American Poetry and Culture, 1945-1980 by Robert Von Hallberg)

Dickinson: Upon the First Centennial (on Dickinson: Strategies of Limitation by Jane Donahue Eberwein; Emily Dickinson and the Life of Language: A Study in Symbolic Poetics by E. Miller Budick; Dickinson: The Anxiety of Gender by Vivian R. Pollak; & The Master Letters of Emily Dickinson by R. W. Franklin)

Greg Johnson, whose reviews have appeared regularly in our pages across many years, has published two novels, five collections of short stories, and several volumes of nonfiction. He lives in Atlanta and teaches in the graduate writing program at Kennesaw State University.

The Evolution of Heroes’ Honor in the Southern Literary Tradition

The Flight of Starlings

Paul Hamill, who returns to The Georgia Review’s pages after two decades, is a retired college administrator and English professor. His work appears in many journals, including Mudlark and Front Porch Review. The latest of his four collections of poetry is a chapbook, Meeting the Minotaur (Split Oak Press, 2011).

Her Book

The Lessons

Thomas Reiter’s most recent book of poems, Catchment, was published by Louisiana State University Press in 2009. His poems have appeared in Poetry, Southern Review, Sewanee Review, Hudson Review, New England Review, and Gettysburg Review. He has received fellowships from the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, the NEA, and the New Jersey State Council on the Arts. Reiter is Professor of Humanities Emeritus at Monmouth University, where he held the Wayne D. McMurray Endowed Chair in the Humanities.

Replay

“The Catcher in the Rye” and All: Is the Age of Formative Books Over?