Coal, Natural Gas, “Other Material,” and Whiskey: Hydrofracturing Country, USA

Jason Molesky is a doctoral student in American literature at Princeton University. He earned his MFA at the University of Mississippi, where he was a John and Renee Grisham Fellow in creative writing. He has worked as a coal miner, a forklift operator, a security contractor, and a brain injury outreach coordinator, and has been a resident fellow at the Blue Mountain Center. Molesky lives with his partner in Lawrenceville, NJ.

3-D

Thomas Allen’s photographs have appeared in numerous magazines (including Harper’s) and on the covers of three James Ellroy novels, as well as in Uncovered: Photographs by Thomas Allen (Aperture, 2007). His work has been exhibited at the Foley Gallery in New York and Thomas Barry Fine Arts in Minneapolis, among many other galleries. He has a BFA from Wayne State University and an MFA from the University of Minnesota.

on full-metal indigiqueer by Joshua Whitehead

Shanae Aurora Martínez is an assistant professor of English specializing in Indigenous literatures at California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo. She holds degrees from the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee and the University of California at Davis. She has served as an editor and labor organizer, and her work can be found in Studies in American Indian Literatures, The Georgia Review, and Cream City Review.

on Dear All by Maggie Anderson

Susan Shaw Sailer lives in West Virginia. She has published two books, Ship of Light (Port Yonder Press, 2013) and The God of Roundabouts (WordTech Communications, 2016), as well as a chapbook, Coal (Finishing Line Press, 2012). Her poems have appeared in such journals as Main Street Rag and Pittsburgh Poetry Review.

on Invocation to Daughters by Barbara Jane Reyes

Jeremy Allan Hawkins has received a grant from the U.S. Fulbright Program and a fellowship from the Alabama Prison Arts and Education Project. He is the author of A Clean Edge, winner of the 2016 BOAAT Chapbook Prize. His poetry has been selected for the 2016 Best New Poets anthology, and his work appeared in the Time Space Existence exhibition at the 2018 Venice Biennale of Architecture. He lives in France.

What I Asked

Keith Ratzlaff teaches poetry and literature at Central College in Pella, Iowa. His most recent books of poetry, Then, A Thousand Crows (2009) and Dubious Angels: Poems after Paul Klee (2005), are from Anhinga Press, as will be his next, Who’s Asking? His poems and reviews have appeared recently in the Cincinnati Review, Arts and Letters, Colorado Review, and the American Reader; his honors include the Theodore Roethke Award, two Pushcart Prizes, and inclusion in The Best American Poetry 2009. 

The Fens, 1630s

Brian Swann’s most recent collections are Another Log on the Fire: New and Selected Fiction (MadHat Press, 2019) and Sunday Out of Nowhere: New and Selected Poems (Sheep Meadow Press, 2018). 

Obituary for Silence & The Ancestors Remain Unhelpful with the Recent Tide of Events

Heather Altfeld is a poet and essayist. Her first book of poetry, The Disappearing Theatre (Poets at Work, 2016), won the Poets at Work Prize. Her work appears in Conjunctions, Narrative Magazine, Pleiades, Poetry Northwest, the Los Angeles Review, and other literary journals. She currently teaches in the honors program and for the comparative religion and humanities department at California State University–Chico.

Domestic This

Julie Marie Wade is co-author (with Denise Duhamel) of Unrhymables: Collaborations in Prose (Noctuary Press, 2019). Other works include Same-Sexy Marriage: A Novella in Poems (2018) and When I Was Straight (2014), both from A Midsummer Night’s Press. She teaches in the creative writing program at Florida International University and reviews regularly for Lambda Literary Review and The Rumpus. She is married to Angie Griffin and lives on Hollywood Beach.

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