Poem in Death Valley

Joyce Carol Oates is the author of some one hundred books in multiple genres, including the novel Little Bird of Heaven (2009), the story collection Sourland (2010), and the memoir A Widow’s Story (2011), all from Ecco. The 2010 recipient of the Ivan Sandrof Award for Lifetime Achievement of the National Book Critics Circle, Oates is the Roger S. Berlind Distinguished Professor of the Humanities at Princeton University, where she has taught since 1978. Oates’s “Ballerina” appeared in our fortieth-anniversary retrospective (Spring 1986).

Technically Sweet

Reg Saner’s prose and poetry have appeared in more than a hundred and fifty literary magazines and in over sixty anthologies. Among other honors, his previous writings, all set in the American West, have won several national prizes. His poetry collection, Climbing into the Roots (1976) received the first Walt Whitman Award as conferred by the Academy of American Poets and the Copernicus Society of America. His second book, So This Is the Map (1981), was a National Poetry Series “Open Competition” winner, selected by Derek Walcott. He has won a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship, the Creede Repertory Theater Award, the State of Colorado Governor’s Award, and has been an invited Resident Scholar at the Rockefeller Fondazione Culturale in Bellagio, Italyand received the Wallace Stegner Award conferred by the Center of the American West.

The Invisible Hand

Questions About Angels

Billy Collins’ latest collection of poetry is Horoscopes for the Dead (Random House, 2011). A former U.S. poet laureate, he is a Distinguished Professor at Lehman College (CUNY) and a Distinguished Fellow of the Winter Park Institute at Rollins College.

The Disappearance of Man

on Feminist Literary Criticism by Janet Todd

Catherine Rogers teaches English at Savannah State University. Her work has appeared in Kalliope: A Journal of Women’s Art, Paideuma, and Women’s Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal, as well as in the online journals Autumn Sky Poetry and Touch: The Journal of Healing. She cherishes happy memories of having been the very first graduate editorial assistant of The Georgia Review.

on The Hopper Light by David Rigsbee

on Home Economics by Wendell Berry

on The Collected Letters of William Morris. Volume I, Volume IIA, Volume IIB by Norman Kelvin

Gerald Weales’s “American Theater Watch” appeared in these pages from 1978 until 2010, and we have also featured on occasion his essays and reviews on topics that have included World War II and the early-career political cartoons of one Theodore Geisel (a.k.a. Dr. Seuss). In addition to his distinguished career as an author and drama specialist, Weales was a longtime professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania, from which he retired in 1987; a senior Fulbright scholar at the University of Sri Lanka; and the recipient of a Guggenheim fellowship.