1991 State of Human Rights Address

Jimmy Carter (b. 1924), former governor of Georgia and thirty-ninth president of the United States, is the author of numerous books, ranging from memoir to policy analysis to poetry. With The Hornet’s Nest (2003), a work of historical fiction, he became the first U.S. president to publish a novel. His collection of essays, Our Endangered Values: America’s Moral Crisis (2005), was a national bestseller and was honored by the Georgia Writers Association; his nonfiction book Palestine: Peace Not Apartheid (2006) generated international attention and some controversy. His latest books include A Remarkable Mother (2008), a memoir of Lillian Carter; We Can Have Peace in the Holy Land: a Plan That Will Work (2009); White House Diary (2010); and Through the Year with Jimmy Carter: 366 Daily Meditations from the 39th President (Zondervan, 2011) with Steve Halliday. After leaving office in 1981, he founded the Carter Center in Atlanta and has remained active in international politics and human rights advocacy. In 2002 he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. (Inducted in 2006)

on Mandelstam Variations by David Morley

on Meetings with Time by Carl Dennis

Stephen Corey joined the staff of The Georgia Review in 1983 as assistant editor and subsequently has served as associate editor, acting editor, and, since 2008, editor. His most recent book is Startled at the Big Sound: Essays Personal, Literary, and Cultural (Mercer University Press, 2017); he has also published nine collections of poems, among them There Is No Finished World (White Pine Press) and Synchronized Swimming (Livingston Press); his individual poems, essays, and reviews have appeared in dozens of periodicals; and he has coedited three books in as many genres, including (with Warren Slesinger) Spreading the Word: Editors on Poetry (The Bench Press). Over the past thirty-five years he has served as poet-in-residence or visiting poet/editor for numerous writing programs, conferences, and other literary gatherings, and he is currently a member of the core faculty for the low-residency MFA program at Reinhardt University. Born in Buffalo and reared in Jamestown, New York, Stephen Corey holds BA and MA degrees from Harpur College (now Binghamton University) and a PhD from the University of Florida.

on Narodniki Women: Russian Women Who Sacrificed Themselves for the Dream of Freedom by Margaret Maxwell

on The Practice of the Wild by Gary Snyder

on Into the Badlands by John Williams

Once Upon a Time: Narrative Poetry Returns? (on Covenant by Alan Shapiro; The Black Riviera by Mark Jarman; Autumn Eros and Other Poems by Mary Kinzie; The Gathering of My Name by Cornelius Eady; & Saints in Their Ox-hide Boat by Brendan Galvin)

Heart Troubles (on A Model World and Other Stories by Michael Chabon; The Language We Use Up Here and Other Stories by Philip Gambone; Crash Diet by Jill McCorkle; & Labor for Love by Sandy Huss)

Greg Johnson, whose reviews have appeared regularly in our pages across many years, has published two novels, five collections of short stories, and several volumes of nonfiction. He lives in Atlanta and teaches in the graduate writing program at Kennesaw State University.

Two days before