At the Ravine

Margaret Gibson is the current poet laureate of Connecticut and the author of twelve books of poems, all from Louisiana State University Press, most recently Not Hearing the Wood Thrush (2018) and The Glass Globe (forthcoming in 2021), as well as a memoir, The Prodigal Daughter (University of Missouri Press, 2008). The Vigil (1993) was a finalist for the National Book Award in Poetry; Broken Cup (2016) was a finalist for the Poets’ Prize, and its title poem won a Pushcart Prize that year. Gibson is professor emerita at the University of Connecticut.

Wave & Particle & “Winter, Leper of the World”

From Here

Four Cut Sunflowers, One Upside Down

Rainy-Day Ears

Jerry McGahan (1943–2016), beekeeper and much else, was the author of the story collection The Deer Walking Upside Down (Schaffner Press, 2015) and the novel A Condor Brings the Sun (1996). His stories and essays were published by the Iowa Review, the Antioch Review, the Gettysburg Review, Ploughshares, and other literary journals. McGahan passed away with his wife, Janet, by his side in Arlee, Montana, on the land he had loved for almost fifty years.

Close to Trees

Gary Gildner has contributed to The Georgia Review numerous poems and stories, four essays, a book review, and an exchange of letters with the late novelist Raymond Andrews. His latest collection of poems is Cleaning a Rainbow (BkMk Press, 2007); his latest collection of stories is The Capital of Kansas City (BkMk Press, 2016). He has received Pushcart Prizes in fiction and nonfiction, and the Iowa Poetry Prize for The Bunker in the Parsley Fields (University of Iowa Press). Gildner and his wife Michele live in the Clearwater Mountains of Idaho and in the foothills of Arizona’s Santa Catalina Mountains.

Touch-Me-Not

Chase Twichell’s most recent book is Horses Where the Answers Should Have Been: New & Selected Poems (Copper Canyon Press, 2010), which won both the Kingsley Tufts Award from Claremont Graduate University and the Balcones Poetry Prize. A new book, Things as It Is, is forthcoming from Copper Canyon in 2018.

Replacing Memory

Barry Lopez’s essays and fiction have been appearing in The Georgia Review since 1993; he was the keynote speaker at our third annual Earth Day Program in 2011, and for this year’s eleventh edition he will be our first repeat presenter. His Of Wolves and Men (1978) won the John Burroughs Medal for Nature Writing and was a finalist for the National Book Award—which his Arctic Dreams (1986) won. Lopez’s numerous short-story collections include Outside (Trinity University Press, 2015) and Resistance (Vintage, 2004); also among his more than a dozen volumes are the novella-length fable Crow and Weasel (1990) and (with Debra Gwartney) Home Ground: Language for an American Landscape (Trinity University Press, 2006). A world traveler to more than seventy countries, Barry Lopez has lived for decades on the upper McKenzie River in Oregon.

To Be a Folder of the Creek