The Resurrection of George T. Sutton

James Kilgo (1941–2002) was born in Darlington, South Carolina. He graduated from Wofford College, then went on to receive his MA and PhD in American Literature from Tulane University. In 1967 he joined the faculty of the English department at the University of Georgia, where he remained until his retirement in 1999. Though he didn’t begin his creative writing career until he was well into his 30s, by the time he died in 2002 Kilgo had become an author both critically acclaimed and widely-read. His books include the essay collections Deep Enough for Ivorybills (1988) and Inheritance of Horses (1994); the Townsend Prize–winning novel Daughter of My People (1998); and the posthumously released autobiographical travel narrative Colors of Africa (2003). He also wrote The Blue Wall: Wilderness of the Carolinas and Georgia (1996) in collaboration with photographer Thomas Wyche, and in 1999 published the memoir The Hand-Carved Creche and Other Christmas Stories. (Inducted in 2011)

Three Epigrams

It Begins with a Presentiment

Susan Ludvigson, Professor Emerita at Winthrop University, was the 2014 winner of the James Dickey Prize for Poetry from Five Points magazine. She has published eight collections of poems with LSU Press, including Escaping the House of Certainty (2006). The first line of “Dead,” appearing here, is the title of her next collection. Most recently, her poems can be found in the Yale Review and the Southern Review.

“Speak, Video”: Life, Death, and Memory in the New Age

Her Face

One Explanation

Pluck

The Boys

Jim Heynen’s short-short stories have appeared frequently in The Georgia Review. A new collection of his short-shorts, Ordinary Sins: After Theophrastus, is forthcoming from Milkweed Editions in 2014. He lives in St. Paul, Minnesota.

There Is No Wind in Heaven