The Boys

Jim Heynen’s short-short stories have appeared frequently in The Georgia Review. A new collection of his short-shorts, Ordinary Sins: After Theophrastus, is forthcoming from Milkweed Editions in 2014. He lives in St. Paul, Minnesota.

There Is No Wind in Heaven

Set Theory

1992 State of Human Rights Address

Jimmy Carter (b. 1924), former governor of Georgia and thirty-ninth president of the United States, is the author of numerous books, ranging from memoir to policy analysis to poetry. With The Hornet’s Nest (2003), a work of historical fiction, he became the first U.S. president to publish a novel. His collection of essays, Our Endangered Values: America’s Moral Crisis (2005), was a national bestseller and was honored by the Georgia Writers Association; his nonfiction book Palestine: Peace Not Apartheid (2006) generated international attention and some controversy. His latest books include A Remarkable Mother (2008), a memoir of Lillian Carter; We Can Have Peace in the Holy Land: a Plan That Will Work (2009); White House Diary (2010); and Through the Year with Jimmy Carter: 366 Daily Meditations from the 39th President (Zondervan, 2011) with Steve Halliday. After leaving office in 1981, he founded the Carter Center in Atlanta and has remained active in international politics and human rights advocacy. In 2002 he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. (Inducted in 2006)

on The Laughing Place by Pam Durban

Maura Mandyck, several of whose reviews have appeared previously in our pages, holds degrees in English from the University of Notre Dame and the University of Georgia, and in library science from the University of Alabama. She has worked as a librarian for the Nashville Public Library and for Athens Academy, and is now an instructional librarian at Spring Hill College, where she also teaches in the English department. She lives in Mobile, Alabama, with three dogs, two cats, and lots and lots of books.

on A Space Filled with Moving by Maggie Anderson

Carol Frost’s latest collection of poems, Honeycomb (TriQuarterly Books, 2010), won a Florida Book Awards gold medal; her other honors include two National Endowment for the Arts fellowships and four Pushcart prizes. Frost teaches at Rollins College, where she directs the annual Winter with the Writers literary festival.

on Stepping Westward: The Long Search for Home in the Pacific Northwest by Sallie Tisdale

Maurya Simon’s tenth volume of poetry, The Wilderness: New & Selected Poems, 1980–2016, was recently published by Red Hen Press (2018). Other recent publications include The Raindrop’s Gospel: The Trials of St. Jerome & St. Paula (Elixir Press, 2010), and Questions My Daughter Asked Me, Answers I Never Gave Her (Blackbird Press, 2014). Simon has received an NEA Fellowship in poetry and two awards from the Poetry Society of America, and this fall she will serve her third visiting artist residency at the American Academy in Rome. Simon is currently a Professor of the Graduate Division and a Professor Emerita at the University of California–Riverside, where she taught literature and creative writing for nearly thirty years.

on Beyond PC: Toward a Politics of Understanding by Patricia Aufderheide

on Forests: The Shadow of Civilization by Robert Pogue Harrison

Doug Carlson joined the Review staff in January 2007 and works primarily in manuscript evaluation and nonfiction editing. Carlson’s essays on natural and cultural history have appeared frequently in magazines and journals as well as in several anthologies, including A Place Apart (W. W. Norton) and The Sacred Place (University of Utah Press). His work has been collected in two books: At the Edge (White Pine Press) and When We Say We’re Home (University of Utah Press). His most recent book, Roger Tory Peterson: A Biography, was published by the University of Texas Press in 2007. Before coming to the Review, Carlson was visiting writer-in-residence at Concordia College in Moorhead, Minnesota. He is a former chair of the UGA Press Faculty Editorial Board and has served in editorial or advisory capacities for Ascent magazine, White Pine Press, and New Rivers Press.