The Stories Letters Tell (on The Gonne-Yeats 1893-1938 by Anna MacBride White, A. Norman Jeffares; The Last Word: Letters Between Marcia Nardi and William Carlos Williams by Elizabeth Murrie O’Neil; & Quiet Moments in a War: The Letters of Jean-Paul Sartre to Simone de Beauvoir 1940-1963 by Simone de Beauvoir, Lee Fahnestock, and Norman MacAfee)

After the Losses (on The Alchemy of Illness by Kat Duff; Intoxicated by My Illness: And Other Writings on Life and Death by Anatole Broyard and Alexandra Broyard; Broken Vessels by Andre Dubus; Refuge: An Unnatural History of Family and Place by Terry Tempest Williams; Carnal Acts by Nancy Mairs; Life Work by Donald Hall; A Whole New Life: An Illness and a Healing by Reynolds Price)

Inner Worlds (on Do Not Peel the Birches by Fleda Brown Jackson; The Physicist at the Mall by Janet Holmes; Before Our Eyes by Lawrence Joseph; The City of Women: A Sequence of Poems and Prose by Sherod Santos; & Moss Burning by Marianne Boruch)

Judith Kitchen passed away on 6 November 2014, just days after completing work on the essay-review in Spring 2015 Georgia Review. The contributor’s note she supplied read as follows: “Judith Kitchen has three new forthcoming essays—in the Harvard Review, Great River Review, and River Teeth. Her most recent book, The Circus Train, was the lead publication in a new venture—Ovenbird Books, at ovenbirdbooks.org.” To that we respectfully add this brief overview of her writing and teaching career: Kitchen began as a poet, publishing the volume Perennials as the winner of the 1985 Anhinga Press Poetry Prize. She then shifted to prose writing of several sorts, with emphases on essays and reviews. Her four essay volumes are Only the Dance: Essays on Time and Memory (University of South Carolina Press, 1994); Distance and Direction (Graywolf Press, 2002); Half in Shade: Family, Photographs, and Fate (Coffee House Press, 2012); and The Circus Train (Ovenbird Books, 2013)—which appeared first, almost in its entirety, in the Summer 2013 issue of The Georgia Review. In 1998 Kitchen published a critical study, Writing the World: Understanding William Stafford (University of Oregon Press), and in 2002 a novel, The House on Eccles Road (Graywolf Press). She also conceived and edited three important collections of brief nonfiction pieces, all published by W. W. Norton: In Short (1996), In Brief (1999), and Short Takes (2005)—the first two coedited by Mary Paumier Jones. Kitchen also founded State Street Press in the early 1980s, bringing out over the next twenty years seventy-six poetry chapbooks, two pamphlets, five full-length poetry volumes, two collections of translations, and a poetry anthology—the State Street Reader. After teaching for many years at SUNY-Brockport—not all that far from her birthplace of Painted Post, NY—Judith retired and moved with her husband Stan Sanvel Rubin to Port Townsend, WA, from which they founded and co-directed for a decade the Rainier Writing Workshop low-residency MFA program at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma. The collection What Persists
Selected Essays on Poetry from The Georgia Review, 1988–2014 was published by the University of Georgia Press in 2015.

Losses

American Theater Watch, 1993–1994

Gerald Weales’s “American Theater Watch” appeared in these pages from 1978 until 2010, and we have also featured on occasion his essays and reviews on topics that have included World War II and the early-career political cartoons of one Theodore Geisel (a.k.a. Dr. Seuss). In addition to his distinguished career as an author and drama specialist, Weales was a longtime professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania, from which he retired in 1987; a senior Fulbright scholar at the University of Sri Lanka; and the recipient of a Guggenheim fellowship.

Angels

Robert Wrigley, Distinguished Professor Emeritus at the University of Idaho, lives in the high-mountain woods near Moscow. His eleventh and most recent book of poems is Box (Penguin, 2017).

I Am the Stomach

Against Closing

Fabric