Exit 19-A

Ronder Thomas Young (1954­–2006) published three award-winning young adult novels: Objects in Mirror (Roaring Book Press, 2002), one of the New York Public Library’s 2003 Best Books for the Teen Age; Moving Mama to Town (Orchard Books, 1997), recipient of the International Reading Association Award; and Learning by Heart (Houghton Mifflin, 1993; Puffin Books, 1995), an American Library Association Notable Book. Her short stories, essays, and articles appeared in The Georgia Review, Greensboro Review, Southeast Review, Writer’s Digest, Atlanta, Yemassee, storySouth, and Carve, among many others. At her death she was living in Norcross, Georgia; she is a native of South Carolina, where the Anderson County Library System is raising funds to establish a reading room in her memory.

Of Possibility: Another Autumn Leaving

Pattiann Rogers has published fourteen books of poetry, most recently Holy Heathen Rhapsody (Penguin, 2013), and a selection of her uncollected poems is forthcoming from Penguin/Random House in 2018. A gathering of 329 journals and magazines containing her poems was recently acquired by Texas Tech University and is housed in the Sowell Family Collection in Literature, Community, and the Natural World.

What It’s For

Out of Place: Reading O’ Brien and O’ Brien

Judith Kitchen passed away on 6 November 2014, just days after completing work on the essay-review in Spring 2015 Georgia Review. The contributor’s note she supplied read as follows: “Judith Kitchen has three new forthcoming essays—in the Harvard Review, Great River Review, and River Teeth. Her most recent book, The Circus Train, was the lead publication in a new venture—Ovenbird Books, at ovenbirdbooks.org.” To that we respectfully add this brief overview of her writing and teaching career: Kitchen began as a poet, publishing the volume Perennials as the winner of the 1985 Anhinga Press Poetry Prize. She then shifted to prose writing of several sorts, with emphases on essays and reviews. Her four essay volumes are Only the Dance: Essays on Time and Memory (University of South Carolina Press, 1994); Distance and Direction (Graywolf Press, 2002); Half in Shade: Family, Photographs, and Fate (Coffee House Press, 2012); and The Circus Train (Ovenbird Books, 2013)—which appeared first, almost in its entirety, in the Summer 2013 issue of The Georgia Review. In 1998 Kitchen published a critical study, Writing the World: Understanding William Stafford (University of Oregon Press), and in 2002 a novel, The House on Eccles Road (Graywolf Press). She also conceived and edited three important collections of brief nonfiction pieces, all published by W. W. Norton: In Short (1996), In Brief (1999), and Short Takes (2005)—the first two coedited by Mary Paumier Jones. Kitchen also founded State Street Press in the early 1980s, bringing out over the next twenty years seventy-six poetry chapbooks, two pamphlets, five full-length poetry volumes, two collections of translations, and a poetry anthology—the State Street Reader. After teaching for many years at SUNY-Brockport—not all that far from her birthplace of Painted Post, NY—Judith retired and moved with her husband Stan Sanvel Rubin to Port Townsend, WA, from which they founded and co-directed for a decade the Rainier Writing Workshop low-residency MFA program at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma. The collection What Persists
Selected Essays on Poetry from The Georgia Review, 1988–2014 was published by the University of Georgia Press in 2015.

Going to Extremes (on The Work of Atget: The Ancien Régime by John Szarkowski, Maria Morris; Mountains of the Middle Kingdom by Galen Rowell; Worlds in a Small Room by Irving Penn; &El Salvador by Harry Mattison, Susan Meiselas, Fae Rubinstein, Carolyn Forché)

Downpour

Autumn Leaves

Jeff Mock, the author of Ruthless (Three Candles Press, 2010), teaches in the MFA writing program at Southern Connecticut State University. His poems appear in the Atlantic Monthly, the Iowa Review, New England Review, North American Review, Shenandoah, the Sewanee Review, the Southern Review, and elsewhere.

Three Short Tales

Gary Gildner has contributed to The Georgia Review numerous poems and stories, four essays, a book review, and an exchange of letters with the late novelist Raymond Andrews. His latest collection of poems is Cleaning a Rainbow (BkMk Press, 2007); his latest collection of stories is The Capital of Kansas City (BkMk Press, 2016). He has received Pushcart Prizes in fiction and nonfiction, and the Iowa Poetry Prize for The Bunker in the Parsley Fields (University of Iowa Press). Gildner and his wife Michele live in the Clearwater Mountains of Idaho and in the foothills of Arizona’s Santa Catalina Mountains.

Riffs and Reciprocities

Stephen Dunn is the author of numerous books of poetry and prose. His Degrees of Fidelity: Essays on Poetry and the Latitudes of the Personal,  is due out from Tiger Bark Press in October 2018, and a new collection of poems, Pagan Virtues, is scheduled to be published by W. W. Norton in 2019. He has been the recipient of many awards, including the 2001 Pulitzer Prize in Poetry for Different Hours, and he has had fellowships from the Guggenheim and Rockefeller foundations. Dunn lives in Frostburg, Maryland, with his wife, the writer Barbara Hurd.