Hemingway’s Wound—And Its Consequences for American Literature

Telling Lives (on The Night in Question by Tobias Wolff; You’re So Beautiful by Eileen FitzGerald; The Worldwide Church of the Handicapped by Marie Sheppard Williams; and After Rain by William Trevor)

Erin McGraw is the author of six books, most recently the novel Better Food for a Better World (Slant Books, 2013). Her stories and essays have appeared in The Georgia Review, The Atlantic, STORY, the Southern Review, Allure, and other magazines and journals. She lives in Tennessee with her husband, the poet Andrew Hudgins.

 

Nine Recent Chapbooks: A Few Slips of Paper in the Pages (on Wild Peavines by Robert Morgan; Gristle by R. T. Smith; The Keepers of Light by Michele Wolf; Rude Noises by Martha Meek; Holding Ground by Becky Gould Gibson; In Defense of Stones by Janet MacFadyen; The Wave He Caught by Rick Noguchi; Millrat by Michael Casey; and The Tan Chanteuse by Carol Boston Weatherford)

Still Crazy (or Fuming) After All These Years (on Radical Son: A Generational Odyssey by David Horowitz; A Tale of Two Utopias: The Political Journey of the Generation of 1968 by Paul Berman; For the Hell of It: The Life and Times of Abbie Hoffman by Jonah Raskin; Making Peace with the 60s by David Burner; and Reassessing the Sixties: Debating the Political and Cultural Legacy by Stephen Macedo)

What Persists (on Chickamauga by Charles Wright; Sun Under Wood by Robert Hass; Connecting the Dots by Maxine Kumin; Crossing to Sunlight: Selected Poems by Paul Zimmer; Alive Together: New and Selected Poems by Lisel Mueller; and Collected Poems by Leslie Norris)

Judith Kitchen passed away on 6 November 2014, just days after completing work on the essay-review in Spring 2015 Georgia Review. The contributor’s note she supplied read as follows: “Judith Kitchen has three new forthcoming essays—in the Harvard Review, Great River Review, and River Teeth. Her most recent book, The Circus Train, was the lead publication in a new venture—Ovenbird Books, at ovenbirdbooks.org.” To that we respectfully add this brief overview of her writing and teaching career: Kitchen began as a poet, publishing the volume Perennials as the winner of the 1985 Anhinga Press Poetry Prize. She then shifted to prose writing of several sorts, with emphases on essays and reviews. Her four essay volumes are Only the Dance: Essays on Time and Memory (University of South Carolina Press, 1994); Distance and Direction (Graywolf Press, 2002); Half in Shade: Family, Photographs, and Fate (Coffee House Press, 2012); and The Circus Train (Ovenbird Books, 2013)—which appeared first, almost in its entirety, in the Summer 2013 issue of The Georgia Review. In 1998 Kitchen published a critical study, Writing the World: Understanding William Stafford (University of Oregon Press), and in 2002 a novel, The House on Eccles Road (Graywolf Press). She also conceived and edited three important collections of brief nonfiction pieces, all published by W. W. Norton: In Short (1996), In Brief (1999), and Short Takes (2005)—the first two coedited by Mary Paumier Jones. Kitchen also founded State Street Press in the early 1980s, bringing out over the next twenty years seventy-six poetry chapbooks, two pamphlets, five full-length poetry volumes, two collections of translations, and a poetry anthology—the State Street Reader. After teaching for many years at SUNY-Brockport—not all that far from her birthplace of Painted Post, NY—Judith retired and moved with her husband Stan Sanvel Rubin to Port Townsend, WA, from which they founded and co-directed for a decade the Rainier Writing Workshop low-residency MFA program at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma. The collection What Persists
Selected Essays on Poetry from The Georgia Review, 1988–2014 was published by the University of Georgia Press in 2015.

Dancer & Fifty Tears

Martha Graham, Audio Description Of

The Extra

Flickers

William Trowbridge’s latest collection, Put This On, Please: New and Selected Poems, was published in March 2013 by Red Hen Press. His other collections include Ship of Fool (Red Hen, 2011), and The Complete Book of Kong (Southeast Missouri State University Press, 2003). His poems have appeared in more than thirty-five anthologies and textbooks, as well as on The Writer’s Almanac and in such periodicals as Poetry and the Gettysburg Review. Currently poet laureate of Missouri, Trowbridge lives in the Kansas City area and teaches in the University of Nebraska low-residency MFA in writing program.