Harnessing the Horse (on Children in Exile: Poems 1968-1984 by James Fenton; Keeping Company by Gibbons Ruark; Essay on Air by Reg Saner; The House Party by Caroline Knox; & Home by Jim Simmerman)

“I Gotta Use Words…” (on The Patience of the Cloud Photographer by Elizabeth Holmes; Pears, Lake, Sun by Sandy Solomon; The Hour Between Dog and Wolf by Laure-Anne Bosselaar; Eve by Annie Finch; Candy Necklace by Cal Bedient; The Fields of Praise: New and Selected Poems by Marilyn Nelson; & Ardor: The Book of the Dead Man, Volume 2 by Marvin Bell)

Judith Kitchen passed away on 6 November 2014, just days after completing work on the essay-review in Spring 2015 Georgia Review. The contributor’s note she supplied read as follows: “Judith Kitchen has three new forthcoming essays—in the Harvard Review, Great River Review, and River Teeth. Her most recent book, The Circus Train, was the lead publication in a new venture—Ovenbird Books, at ovenbirdbooks.org.” To that we respectfully add this brief overview of her writing and teaching career: Kitchen began as a poet, publishing the volume Perennials as the winner of the 1985 Anhinga Press Poetry Prize. She then shifted to prose writing of several sorts, with emphases on essays and reviews. Her four essay volumes are Only the Dance: Essays on Time and Memory (University of South Carolina Press, 1994); Distance and Direction (Graywolf Press, 2002); Half in Shade: Family, Photographs, and Fate (Coffee House Press, 2012); and The Circus Train (Ovenbird Books, 2013)—which appeared first, almost in its entirety, in the Summer 2013 issue of The Georgia Review. In 1998 Kitchen published a critical study, Writing the World: Understanding William Stafford (University of Oregon Press), and in 2002 a novel, The House on Eccles Road (Graywolf Press). She also conceived and edited three important collections of brief nonfiction pieces, all published by W. W. Norton: In Short (1996), In Brief (1999), and Short Takes (2005)—the first two coedited by Mary Paumier Jones. Kitchen also founded State Street Press in the early 1980s, bringing out over the next twenty years seventy-six poetry chapbooks, two pamphlets, five full-length poetry volumes, two collections of translations, and a poetry anthology—the State Street Reader. After teaching for many years at SUNY-Brockport—not all that far from her birthplace of Painted Post, NY—Judith retired and moved with her husband Stan Sanvel Rubin to Port Townsend, WA, from which they founded and co-directed for a decade the Rainier Writing Workshop low-residency MFA program at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma. The collection What Persists
Selected Essays on Poetry from The Georgia Review, 1988–2014 was published by the University of Georgia Press in 2015.

When Privacy Becomes Everybody’s Business (on Private Matters: In Defense of the Personal Life by Janna Malamud Smith; Life in a Day by Doris Grumbach; and Portrait of My Body by Phillip Lopate)

Manifesto

Reg Saner’s prose and poetry have appeared in more than a hundred and fifty literary magazines and in over sixty anthologies. Among other honors, his previous writings, all set in the American West, have won several national prizes. His poetry collection, Climbing into the Roots (1976) received the first Walt Whitman Award as conferred by the Academy of American Poets and the Copernicus Society of America. His second book, So This Is the Map (1981), was a National Poetry Series “Open Competition” winner, selected by Derek Walcott. He has won a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship, the Creede Repertory Theater Award, the State of Colorado Governor’s Award, and has been an invited Resident Scholar at the Rockefeller Fondazione Culturale in Bellagio, Italyand received the Wallace Stegner Award conferred by the Center of the American West.

We Were Insects and Animals

Things That Women Taught Me About Water

Jim Heynen’s short-short stories have appeared frequently in The Georgia Review. A new collection of his short-shorts, Ordinary Sins: After Theophrastus, is forthcoming from Milkweed Editions in 2014. He lives in St. Paul, Minnesota.

Stay

Do Not Leave Baby Unattended

Angela Perfidia

Margaret Benbow’s poetry has appeared in numerous magazines and anthologies, including Poetry, Kenyon Review, the Antioch Review, Prairie Schooner, and others. Her collection Stalking Joy (1997) won the Walt McDonald First Book award and was published by Texas Tech University Press. She recently completed a second collection, Wild Women in Old Movies, and she has also published short stories—including “Angela Perfidia” in both our Summer 1997 issue and our Spring 2011 fiction retrospective. In 2014 Benbow won the Zona Gale Award from the Council for Wisconsin Writers for the best published short story by a Wisconsin writer.