How the Streets in Front of Kaufmann’s Department Store Tell Me I Am Home

Rick Campbell is a poet and essayist who lives on Alligator Point, Florida.

In the Presence of the Clearwater

Gary Gildner has contributed to The Georgia Review numerous poems and stories, four essays, a book review, and an exchange of letters with the late novelist Raymond Andrews. His latest collection of poems is Cleaning a Rainbow (BkMk Press, 2007); his latest collection of stories is The Capital of Kansas City (BkMk Press, 2016). He has received Pushcart Prizes in fiction and nonfiction, and the Iowa Poetry Prize for The Bunker in the Parsley Fields (University of Iowa Press). Gildner and his wife Michele live in the Clearwater Mountains of Idaho and in the foothills of Arizona’s Santa Catalina Mountains.

Brother Francisco Anthony Eats an Apple

Brendan Galvin is the author of sixteen poetry collections, most recently Habitat: New and Selected Poems, 1965–2005 (2005), a finalist for the National Book Award; Ocean Effects (2007); and Whirl Is King (2008)—all from Louisiana State University Press. His translation of Sophocles’ Women of Trachis appeared in the Penn Greek Drama Series (University of Pennsylvania Press, 1998).

The Blind World, Atomic Battlefields

Paul Zimmer lives on a farm in southwestern Wisconsin. In the fifteen years since his retirement from a long career in university publishing, he has published two books each of poetry and essay-memoir. His first novel, The Mysteries of Soldiers Grove, is forthcoming from Permanent Press in early 2015, when he will be eighty years old—which surely makes him, he believes, one of the oldest first novelists ever.

Ubi Sunt

Elizabeth Dodd’s essay in this issue will appear in her new book, Horizon’s Lens: My Time on the Turning World, forthcoming from the University of Nebraska Press in fall 2012. She teaches at Kansas State University.

on Avatars of the Word: From Papyrus to Cyberspace by James J. O’Donnell

on Twentieth-Century Southern Literature by J. A. Bryant Jr.

on Blank Fictions: Consumerism, Culture and the Contemporary American Novel by James Annesley

on O My Land, My Friends: The Selected Letters of Hart Crane, edited by Langdon Hammer and Brom Weber