Where Is Fire Headed?

Paul Hamill, who returns to The Georgia Review’s pages after two decades, is a retired college administrator and English professor. His work appears in many journals, including Mudlark and Front Porch Review. The latest of his four collections of poetry is a chapbook, Meeting the Minotaur (Split Oak Press, 2011).

Méthode Champenoise

Liza Wieland’s third novel, A Watch of Nightingales (University of Michigan Press, 2009), won the Michigan Literary Fiction Award; her others are Bombshell (2001) and The Names of the Lost (1992), both from Southern Methodist University Press—which also published the second and third of her three story collections: You Can Sleep While I Drive (1999) and Quickening (2010). Wieland has won grants from the NEA, the Christopher Isherwood Foundation, and the North Carolina Arts Council, as well as two Pushcart prizes. She teaches at East Carolina University in Greenville, North Carolina.

We Did Not Fear the Father

Charles Fort’s books include We Did Not Fear the Father: New and Selected Poems (Red Hen Press, 2012) and Mrs. Belladonna’s Supper Club Waltz: New and Selected Prose Poems (Backwaters Press, 2010). Born in working-class New Britain, Connecticut, he is the founder of the Wendy Fort Foundation Theater of Fine Arts. Fort is currently at work on Sorrow Road, a collection of one hundred villanelles, and a novel, The Last Black Hippie in Connecticut.

Mango

Margaret Gibson is the current poet laureate of Connecticut and the author of twelve books of poems, all from Louisiana State University Press, most recently Not Hearing the Wood Thrush (2018) and The Glass Globe (forthcoming in 2021), as well as a memoir, The Prodigal Daughter (University of Missouri Press, 2008). The Vigil (1993) was a finalist for the National Book Award in Poetry; Broken Cup (2016) was a finalist for the Poets’ Prize, and its title poem won a Pushcart Prize that year. Gibson is professor emerita at the University of Connecticut.

My Father’s Hundredth Birthday

Leaving Latitude: Emily Dickinson and Indian Pipes

on Family Trees: The Peach Culture of the Piedmont by Mike Corbin

on The Witness of Combines by Kent Meyers

Doug Carlson joined the Review staff in January 2007 and works primarily in manuscript evaluation and nonfiction editing. Carlson’s essays on natural and cultural history have appeared frequently in magazines and journals as well as in several anthologies, including A Place Apart (W. W. Norton) and The Sacred Place (University of Utah Press). His work has been collected in two books: At the Edge (White Pine Press) and When We Say We’re Home (University of Utah Press). His most recent book, Roger Tory Peterson: A Biography, was published by the University of Texas Press in 2007. Before coming to the Review, Carlson was visiting writer-in-residence at Concordia College in Moorhead, Minnesota. He is a former chair of the UGA Press Faculty Editorial Board and has served in editorial or advisory capacities for Ascent magazine, White Pine Press, and New Rivers Press.

on The Atomic West by Bruce Hevly and John M. Findlay

Reg Saner’s prose and poetry have appeared in more than a hundred and fifty literary magazines and in over sixty anthologies. Among other honors, his previous writings, all set in the American West, have won several national prizes. His poetry collection, Climbing into the Roots (1976) received the first Walt Whitman Award as conferred by the Academy of American Poets and the Copernicus Society of America. His second book, So This Is the Map (1981), was a National Poetry Series “Open Competition” winner, selected by Derek Walcott. He has won a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship, the Creede Repertory Theater Award, the State of Colorado Governor’s Award, and has been an invited Resident Scholar at the Rockefeller Fondazione Culturale in Bellagio, Italyand received the Wallace Stegner Award conferred by the Center of the American West.