Stitt’s Time

Gerald Majer’s poetry, fiction, and essays have appeared in Callaloo, FIELD, The Georgia Review (several times), Puerto del Sol, Quarterly West, Yale Review, and other journals; his creative-nonfiction book The Velvet Lounge was published by Columbia University Press in 2005. Majer teaches literature and creative writing at Stevenson University in Baltimore, Maryland. 

Radio Waves

Some Cloths

Albert Goldbarth is the author of more than twenty-five books of poetry, most recently Selfish (2015), Everyday People (2012), and The Kitchen Sink: New and Selected Poems, 1972–2007 (2007), all from Graywolf Press. He has twice won the National Book Critics Circle Award in Poetry.

Watched and Listened: Stories about the Boys

Jim Heynen’s short-short stories have appeared frequently in The Georgia Review. A new collection of his short-shorts, Ordinary Sins: After Theophrastus, is forthcoming from Milkweed Editions in 2014. He lives in St. Paul, Minnesota.

Natural Selection (on The Wick of Memory: New and Selected Poems, 1970-2000 by Dave Smith; Knowing: New and Selected Poems by Jonathan Holden; The Blessing: New and Selected Poems by Richard Jones; Selected Poems of Anne Sexton by Anne Sexton, edited and with an introduction by Diane Wood Middlebrook and Diana Hume George; Sweet Confluence: New and Selected Poems by Susan Ludvigson; and The Selected Levis by Larry Levis, selected and with an afterword by David St. John)

Greg Johnson, whose reviews have appeared regularly in our pages across many years, has published two novels, five collections of short stories, and several volumes of nonfiction. He lives in Atlanta and teaches in the graduate writing program at Kennesaw State University.

Crass Casualty (on Casualties by Ron Rash; Marked Men by Michael C. White; Glory Goes and Gets Some: Stories by Emily Carter; Troublemakers by John McNally; and Scar Vegas and Other Stories by Tom Paine)

“I Am Telling You This as Calmly as I Can”: A Review of Recent Poetry Chapbooks All in All by Laura Chester; Catch and Release by Jamie Simpson; Fear of Everything by David Starkey; The Memphis Sun by Jim Murphy; A Day’s Work by Rick Campbell; Blue Numbers, Red Life by Roy Jacobstein; and Lilting by R. T. Smith)

Paul Zimmer lives on a farm in southwestern Wisconsin. In the fifteen years since his retirement from a long career in university publishing, he has published two books each of poetry and essay-memoir. His first novel, The Mysteries of Soldiers Grove, is forthcoming from Permanent Press in early 2015, when he will be eighty years old—which surely makes him, he believes, one of the oldest first novelists ever.

on The Scarlet Professor: Newton Arvin, A Literary Life Shattered by Scandal by Barry Werth

Myles Weber’s literary criticism appears frequently in The Georgia Review and many other journals, including New England Review, Kenyon Review, Sewanee Review, Salmagundi, and Michigan Quarterly Review. Associate professor of English at Winona State University in Minnesota, Weber is the author of Consuming Silences: How We Read Authors Who Don’t Publish (University of Georgia Press, 2005) and Middlebrow Annoyances: American Drama in the 21st Century (Gival Press, 2003).

on Karmic Traces, 1993-1999 by Eliot Weinberger