The Beauty Trap

Wanting to Write like Merwin

Upon the Flooding of Our House

Liza Wieland’s third novel, A Watch of Nightingales (University of Michigan Press, 2009), won the Michigan Literary Fiction Award; her others are Bombshell (2001) and The Names of the Lost (1992), both from Southern Methodist University Press—which also published the second and third of her three story collections: You Can Sleep While I Drive (1999) and Quickening (2010). Wieland has won grants from the NEA, the Christopher Isherwood Foundation, and the North Carolina Arts Council, as well as two Pushcart prizes. She teaches at East Carolina University in Greenville, North Carolina.

The Ambrosiana Library

on Assembling My Father: A Daughter’s Detective Story by Anna Cypra Oliver

on Trapeze by Deborah Digges

The Ties That Bind (on Natasha and Other Stories by David Bezmozgis; In the River Province by Lisa Sandlin; Little Edens by Barbara Klein Moss; Sea Dogs by John Bensko; and Little Black Book of Stories by A. S. Byatt)

The Properties of Rain (on Accused of Wisdom by Linda Allardt; The Actual Moon, The Actual Stars by Chris Forhan; Generations by Pattiann Rogers; Delights and Shadows by Ted Kooser; The Perishing by Sherod Santos; and The Rest of Love by Carl Phillips)

Judith Kitchen passed away on 6 November 2014, just days after completing work on the essay-review in Spring 2015 Georgia Review. The contributor’s note she supplied read as follows: “Judith Kitchen has three new forthcoming essays—in the Harvard Review, Great River Review, and River Teeth. Her most recent book, The Circus Train, was the lead publication in a new venture—Ovenbird Books, at ovenbirdbooks.org.” To that we respectfully add this brief overview of her writing and teaching career: Kitchen began as a poet, publishing the volume Perennials as the winner of the 1985 Anhinga Press Poetry Prize. She then shifted to prose writing of several sorts, with emphases on essays and reviews. Her four essay volumes are Only the Dance: Essays on Time and Memory (University of South Carolina Press, 1994); Distance and Direction (Graywolf Press, 2002); Half in Shade: Family, Photographs, and Fate (Coffee House Press, 2012); and The Circus Train (Ovenbird Books, 2013)—which appeared first, almost in its entirety, in the Summer 2013 issue of The Georgia Review. In 1998 Kitchen published a critical study, Writing the World: Understanding William Stafford (University of Oregon Press), and in 2002 a novel, The House on Eccles Road (Graywolf Press). She also conceived and edited three important collections of brief nonfiction pieces, all published by W. W. Norton: In Short (1996), In Brief (1999), and Short Takes (2005)—the first two coedited by Mary Paumier Jones. Kitchen also founded State Street Press in the early 1980s, bringing out over the next twenty years seventy-six poetry chapbooks, two pamphlets, five full-length poetry volumes, two collections of translations, and a poetry anthology—the State Street Reader. After teaching for many years at SUNY-Brockport—not all that far from her birthplace of Painted Post, NY—Judith retired and moved with her husband Stan Sanvel Rubin to Port Townsend, WA, from which they founded and co-directed for a decade the Rainier Writing Workshop low-residency MFA program at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma. The collection What Persists
Selected Essays on Poetry from The Georgia Review, 1988–2014 was published by the University of Georgia Press in 2015.

Mirrors: American Poetry Pure and Impure (on The Resistance to Poetry by James Longenbach; Coin of the Realm: Essays on the Life and Art of Poetry by Carl Phillips; and American Scream: Allen Ginsberg’s Howl and the Making of the Beat Generation by Jonah Raskin)

Edward Butscher’s poetry and criticism have appeared in numerous literary journals and publications, including the Saturday Review of Literature, Newsday, and the American Book Review. In 1976 he published the first biography of Sylvia Plath, and in 1988 his biography Conrad Aiken: Poet of White Horse Vale won the Poetry Society of America’s Melville Cane Award.