on On Bullshit by Harry G. Frankfurt

on Running with the Bulls by Valerie Hemingway

on Hatchet Jobs: Writings on Contemporary Fiction by Dale Peck

Myles Weber’s literary criticism appears frequently in The Georgia Review and many other journals, including New England Review, Kenyon Review, Sewanee Review, Salmagundi, and Michigan Quarterly Review. Associate professor of English at Winona State University in Minnesota, Weber is the author of Consuming Silences: How We Read Authors Who Don’t Publish (University of Georgia Press, 2005) and Middlebrow Annoyances: American Drama in the 21st Century (Gival Press, 2003).

Hello, Sky (on Primer for Non-Native Speakers by Philip Metres; October by Louise Glück; Festival Bone by Karen Rigby; The Everyday Apocalypse by David Thomas Lloyd; Metropolitan Bird Culture by Becky Peterson; Water Stories by Brighde Mullins; Sinners in the Hands: Selections from the Catalog by Ann Killough; and Most Wanted by Muriel Nelson)

Paul Zimmer lives on a farm in southwestern Wisconsin. In the fifteen years since his retirement from a long career in university publishing, he has published two books each of poetry and essay-memoir. His first novel, The Mysteries of Soldiers Grove, is forthcoming from Permanent Press in early 2015, when he will be eighty years old—which surely makes him, he believes, one of the oldest first novelists ever.

Poetic Modernism and the Oceanic Divide (on New British Poetry, edited by Don Paterson and Charles Simic

Kevin Clark’s several books of poems include the forthcoming The Consecrations (Stephen F. Austin State University Press, 2021). His first collection, In the Evening of No Warning (New Issues Poetry and Prose, 2002), earned a grant from the Academy of American Poets, and his second, Self-Portrait with Expletives (2010), won the Pleiades Press prize. His poetry appears in the Southern Review, Ploughshares, Prairie Schooner, Iowa Review, Poetry Northwest, Gulf Coast, and Crazyhorse. A regular critic for The Georgia Review, he’s also published essays in the Southern Review, Papers on Language and Literature, and Contemporary Literary Criticism. He teaches at the Rainier Writing Workshop. 

“Mille Tenderesse, T” (on The Complete Stories of Truman Capote and Too Brief a Treat: The Letters of Truman Capote, edited by Gerald Clarke

Gerald Weales’s “American Theater Watch” appeared in these pages from 1978 until 2010, and we have also featured on occasion his essays and reviews on topics that have included World War II and the early-career political cartoons of one Theodore Geisel (a.k.a. Dr. Seuss). In addition to his distinguished career as an author and drama specialist, Weales was a longtime professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania, from which he retired in 1987; a senior Fulbright scholar at the University of Sri Lanka; and the recipient of a Guggenheim fellowship.

The Engraving

The Kingdom of Heaven

Hotel Boccadasse