The Wasp

on Consuming Silences: How We Read Authors Who Don’t Publish by Myles Weber

on Ogden Nash: The Life and Work of America’s Laureate of Light Verse by Douglas M. Parker

From Voice to Page (on The Writer’s Voice by A. Alvarez and Poets Thinking: Pope, Whitman, Dickinson, Yeats by Helen Vendler)

Between a Rock and a Hard Place (on Damned If I Do by Percival Everett; What You’ve Been Missing by Janet Desaulniers; The Pacific and Other Stories by Mark Helprin; and Sorry I Worried You by Gary Fincke)

The Uses of Adversity: American Nature Writing in Despair (on The Heart of the Sound: An Alaskan Paradise Found and Nearly Lost by Marybeth Holleman; Liquid Land: A Journey through the Florida Everglades by Ted Levin; Absence and Light by John R. Campbell; and The Future of Ice: A Journey into Cold by Gretel Ehrlich)

Doug Carlson joined the Review staff in January 2007 and works primarily in manuscript evaluation and nonfiction editing. Carlson’s essays on natural and cultural history have appeared frequently in magazines and journals as well as in several anthologies, including A Place Apart (W. W. Norton) and The Sacred Place (University of Utah Press). His work has been collected in two books: At the Edge (White Pine Press) and When We Say We’re Home (University of Utah Press). His most recent book, Roger Tory Peterson: A Biography, was published by the University of Texas Press in 2007. Before coming to the Review, Carlson was visiting writer-in-residence at Concordia College in Moorhead, Minnesota. He is a former chair of the UGA Press Faculty Editorial Board and has served in editorial or advisory capacities for Ascent magazine, White Pine Press, and New Rivers Press.

The Art of Fresco

Garrett Hongo was born in Volcano, Hawai‘i, lived as a child in Kahuku on O‘ahu, and grew up thereafter in Los Angeles. He is the author of three collections of poetry, including Pulitzer Prize finalist The River of Heaven (Alfred A. Knopf, 1988), and two memoirs: Volcano: A Memoir of Hawai‘i (Vintage, 1996) and his latest, forthcoming from Pantheon, The Perfect Sound: A Memoir in Stereo. He lives in Eugene, Oregon, and teaches at the University of Oregon, where he is Distinguished Professor in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Bigamy

The Stand-up Cell

David Wagoner has published nineteen books of poems—most recently After the Point of No Return (Copper Canyon Press, 2012)—and ten novels, including The Escape Artist (1965), which Francis Ford Coppola made into a movie in 1982. Winner of the Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize and many other honors, he was a chancellor of the Academy of American Poets for twenty-three years, edited Poetry Northwest from 1966 to 2002, and is professor emeritus of English at the University of Washington. He teaches in the low-residency MFA program of the Whidbey Island Writers Workshop.

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