Best Western

Claire Dunnington lives in Brooklyn, where she writes, tutors, and plays the harp. She received her MFA in nonfiction from Columbia University and has published stories and essays in publications such as SLICE and the Indiana Review. She is currently working on an anti-coming-of-age memoir about growing up with obsessive-compulsive disorder and on a collection of short stories.

Vultures

Lauren Markham’s fiction, essays, and journalism have appeared in Guernica, Harper’s Magazine, Orion, Freeman’s, Lit Hub, Best American Travel Writing, Narrative, The New York Review of Books, and Virginia Quarterly Review, where she is a contributing editor. She is the author of The Far Away Brothers: Two Young Migrants and the Making of an American Life (Crown, 2017), which won the Northern California Book Award, the California Book Award Silver Medal, and the Ridenhour Prize.

In and Out of Order

Brian Henry’s most recent book of poetry, Permanent State, was published by Threadsuns in 2020. He has translated Tomaž Šalamun’s Woods and Chalices (Harcourt, 2008), Aleš Debeljak’s Smugglers (BOA Editions, 2015), and Aleš Šteger’s Above the Sky Beneath the Earth (White Pine Press, 2019) and The Book of Things (BOA Editions, 2010), which won the Best Translated Book Award in Poetry. His numerous honors include the Alice Fay di Castagnola Award, a Slovenian Academy of Arts and Sciences grant, and fellowships from the Howard Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Silk

Alison Hawthorne Deming is the author of A Woven World: On Fashion, Fishermen, and the Sardine Dress (Counterpoint Press, 2021). Her other recent books include Zoologies: On Animals and the Human Spirit (Milkweed Editions, 2014) and the poetry collection Stairway to Heaven (Penguin, 2016). The recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Wallace Stegner Fellowship, National Endowment for the Arts fellowships, and the Walt Whitman Award, she is Regents Professor at the University of Arizona. She lives in Tucson and on Grand Manan Island, New Brunswick, Canada.

The Georgia Review’s Emerging Writer Fellowship Program

The Georgia Review is pleased to announce our Emerging Writer Fellowship Program! Entries will be accepted June 1st—August 15th (additional instructions below).
   
With support from the National Endowment for the Arts, The Georgia Review will publish a special issue …

Song of Suburbia; The Couple; & On Three Hours Sleep

Patrick Phillips’s first book of nonfiction, Blood at the Root: A Racial Cleansing in America (Norton, 2016), was named a best book of the year by the New York Times, the Boston Globe, and Smithsonian. He is also the author of three poetry collections, including Elegy for a Broken Machine (Knopf, 2015), which was a finalist for the National Book Award. Phillips teaches writing and literature at Stanford University.

Devil’s Audience Has Always Been the Same; Devil Nags the Blood; Devil Has Spent Years Trying to Get into Lucinda Williams’s Kitchen; & Devil Consoles Larry’s Unacknowledged Son

Charlie Clark studied poetry at the University of Maryland. His work has appeared in The New England Review, Pleiades, Ploughshares, Smartish Pace, Threepenny Review, West Branch, and other journals. A 2019 NEA fellow and recipient of scholarships to the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, he is the author of The Newest Employee of the Museum of Ruin (Four Way Books, 2020). He lives in Austin, Texas.

Genre Theory; Early English History; Stock Character; & Gay and Lesbian Fiction

James Allen Hall is the author of I Liked You Better Before I Knew You So Well (Cleveland State Poetry Center, 2017), a book of lyric personal essays selected by Chris Kraus for CSU’s Essay Collection Award. His first book of poems is Now You’re the Enemy (University of Arkansas, 2008), which won awards from the Lambda Literary Foundation, the Texas Institute of Letters, and the Fellowship of Southern Writers. A recipient of fellowships from the NEA, the New York Foundation for the Arts, and the Bread Loaf and Sewanee conferences, he teaches creative writing and literature at Washington College, where he directs the Rose O’Neill Literary House.

The Years Between & The Waking Reverie

Floyd Collins earned his MFA and PhD at the University of Arkansas. A book of critical essays on poetry, The Living Artifact, is forthcoming from Stephen F. Austin University Press in spring 2021. The Teresa Poems will appear from Somondoco Press in fall 2021. His poetry and critical prose appear regularly with The Arkansas Review, The Georgia Review, The Gettysburg Review, and The Kenyon Review.