The Two Tinos & Words on the Wind

Roofers

Fleda Brown’s The Woods Are On Fire: New & Selected Poems will be out from the University of Nebraska Press in 2017. A former poet laureate of Delaware, she lives in Traverse City, Michigan, and is on the faculty of the Rainier Writing Workshop, a low-residency MFA program in Tacoma, Washington. 

Fundamentalism and Literature

Round, Polished Stones

Albert Goldbarth is the author of more than twenty-five books of poetry, most recently Selfish (2015), Everyday People (2012), and The Kitchen Sink: New and Selected Poems, 1972–2007 (2007), all from Graywolf Press. He has twice won the National Book Critics Circle Award in Poetry.

Ending with a Line from “Sir Patrick Spens”

Keith Ratzlaff teaches poetry and literature at Central College in Pella, Iowa. His most recent books of poetry, Then, A Thousand Crows (2009) and Dubious Angels: Poems after Paul Klee (2005), are from Anhinga Press, as will be his next, Who’s Asking? His poems and reviews have appeared recently in the Cincinnati Review, Arts and Letters, Colorado Review, and the American Reader; his honors include the Theodore Roethke Award, two Pushcart Prizes, and inclusion in The Best American Poetry 2009. 

On Unlearning to Fly by Jennifer Brice

on The Formalesque: A Guide to Modern Art and Its History by Bernard Smith

White Heat (on A Little Salvation: Poems Old and New by Judson Mitcham; Outlaw Style by R. T. Smith; Foiled Again by J. Allyn Rosser; Cleaning a Rainbow by Gary Gildner; and A New Hunger by Laure-Anne Bosselaar)

Greg Johnson, whose reviews have appeared regularly in our pages across many years, has published two novels, five collections of short stories, and several volumes of nonfiction. He lives in Atlanta and teaches in the graduate writing program at Kennesaw State University.

Time After Time (on Our Former Lives in Art by Jennifer S. Davis; The Gateway: Stories by T. M. McNally; Tell Borges If You See Him: Tales of Contemporary Somnambulism by Peter LaSalle)