on Posthumous Keats: A Personal Biography by Stanley Plumly

Robert Schnall lives in Cleveland, Ohio, and has been reviewing poetry books for many years. His work has appeared in Boston Review, Harvard Review, and the Missouri Review.

on Correspondence: Pablo Picasso, Gertrude Stein edited by Laurence Madeline and translated by Lorna Scott Fox

Linda Simon’s many critical and biographical books range from Coco Chanel (Reaktion Books, 2011) to Dark Light: Electricity and Anxiety from the Telegraph to the X-ray (2004) to Thornton Wilder, His World (1979). A past president of the William James Society and general editor of the journal William James Studies, Simon is a professor of English at Skidmore College.

Essential Themes, Eloquent Variations (on Drowning Lessons by Peter Selgin; Water: Nine Stories by Alyce Miller; Broccoli and Other Tales of Food and Love by Lara Vapnyar; Downriver by Jeanne M. Leiby; and The Poetry Life: Ten Stories by Baron Wormser)

Greg Johnson, whose reviews have appeared regularly in our pages across many years, has published two novels, five collections of short stories, and several volumes of nonfiction. He lives in Atlanta and teaches in the graduate writing program at Kennesaw State University.

Rooming with Jesus

David Wagoner has published nineteen books of poems—most recently After the Point of No Return (Copper Canyon Press, 2012)—and ten novels, including The Escape Artist (1965), which Francis Ford Coppola made into a movie in 1982. Winner of the Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize and many other honors, he was a chancellor of the Academy of American Poets for twenty-three years, edited Poetry Northwest from 1966 to 2002, and is professor emeritus of English at the University of Washington. He teaches in the low-residency MFA program of the Whidbey Island Writers Workshop.

Arsonists

Ann Pancake’s first novel, Strange As This Weather Has Been (2007), was one of Kirkus Review’s Top Ten Fiction Books of 2007, won the 2007 Weatherford Prize, and was a finalist for the 2008 Orion Book Award and the 2008 Washington State Book Award. Her collection of short stories, Given Ground (2001), won the 2000 Bakeless Prize, and she has also received a Whiting Award, a NEA fellowship, and a Pushcart Prize. Her fiction and essays have appeared in such journals and anthologies as Orion, The Georgia Review, Poets & Writers, and New Stories from the South: The Year’s Best. She teaches in the Rainier Writing Workshop, the low-residency MFA program at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma, Washington.

Too Early for Grackles & Woodpile to Woodshed

Sydney Lea’s thirteenth collection of poems, Here, is forthcoming from Four Way Books next year. Also due in 2018, from Vermont’s Green Writers Press, are Lea’s collected newspaper columns from his years as Vermont poet laureate, News That Stay News: Lyric and Everyday Life, his, and a re-issue of his collaborative book of essays with former Delaware poet laureate Fleda Brown, Growing Old in Poetry: Two Poets, Two Lives.

Getting the News: A Signer among Signs

Early Morning, Downtown 1 Train

Rebecca McClanahan is the author of ten books, most recently The Tribal Knot: A Memoir of Family, Community, and a Century of Change (Indiana University Press, 2013) and a revised edition of Word Painting: The Fine Art of Writing Descriptively (Writer’s Digest Books, 2014). Her work has appeared in Best American Essays, Best American Poetry, Kenyon Review, The Georgia Review, and The Sun, and in anthologies published by Doubleday, Norton, Putnam, Penguin, Beacon, St. Martin’s, and numerous others.

Lightening & Jaundice