Stablehands

William Heyen’s Shoah Train: Poems (Etruscan Press, 2004) was a finalist for the National Book Award; Mayapple Press will publish his book-length poem, The Angel Voices, in 2010. A past Senior Fulbright Lecturer in American Literature in Germany, Heyen has been awarded National Endowment for the Arts, Guggenheim, and American Academy of Arts and Letters fellowships, among other prizes and honors. He lives in Brockport, New York.

Atlantic Snore & Via Della Vite

James Schuyler (1923–91) was a Pulitzer Prize–winning poet and a central member of the New York School. Freely Espousing, his first full collection of poetry, was published in 1969, when he was forty-six. His other books include The Crystal Lithium (1972), Hymn to Life (1974), the Pulitzer winner The Morning of the Poem (1980), and A Few Days (1985). Schuyler also wrote novels, plays, and art criticism, and he received the Frank O’Hara Prize for Poetry, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and other honors. His poems in this issue will be included in Other Flowers (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010).

Stroke & Human

Judson Mitcham’s most recent collection is A Little Salvation: Poems Old and New (University of Georgia Press, 2007). He is the current poet laureate of Georgia.

The Spectre of Empire

Derek Walcott, born in the West Indies in 1930, won the 1992 Nobel Prize in Literature. His numerous collections of poetry include Selected Poems (2007), The Prodigal: A Poem (2004), and Tiepolo’s Hound (2000), all from Farrar, Straus and Giroux. He has also written plays and published a collection of essays, What the Twilight Says (1998). Walcott’s many other honors include a MacArthur Foundation “genius” award. “The Spectre of Empire” will be included in White Egrets (2010).

Asking the Dead to Leave

Al Maginnes’ most recent poetry collection, Inventing Constellations, was published in October 2012 by Cherry Grove Collections and is reviewed in this issue (see page 366). New poems appear or are forthcoming in American Literary Review, Southern Humanities Review, Sugar House Review, Border Crossings, Crab Creek Review, and several others. Maginnes lives in Raleigh, NC, and teaches at Wake Technical Community College.

The Girl in the Neon Tank Top & The Good News

Stephen Dunn is the author of numerous books of poetry and prose. His Degrees of Fidelity: Essays on Poetry and the Latitudes of the Personal,  is due out from Tiger Bark Press in October 2018, and a new collection of poems, Pagan Virtues, is scheduled to be published by W. W. Norton in 2019. He has been the recipient of many awards, including the 2001 Pulitzer Prize in Poetry for Different Hours, and he has had fellowships from the Guggenheim and Rockefeller foundations. Dunn lives in Frostburg, Maryland, with his wife, the writer Barbara Hurd.

Letter to New Zealand

Alice Friman’s seventh collection of poetry is Blood Weather, forthcoming from Louisiana State University Press in 2019. She’s the winner of a Pushcart Prize and is included in Best American Poetry. New work is forthcoming in PloughsharesPlume, Shenandoah, Western Humanities Review, and others. She lives in Milledgeville, Georgia, where she was poet-in-residence at Georgia College and State University.

The Dew-Tasters; Drosophila; & Through Gumroot Swamp

Lola Haskins’s latest collection of poems, her fifteenth, is Asylum: Improvisations on John Clare (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2019).

Wild

Gary Gildner has contributed to The Georgia Review numerous poems and stories, four essays, a book review, and an exchange of letters with the late novelist Raymond Andrews. His latest collection of poems is Cleaning a Rainbow (BkMk Press, 2007); his latest collection of stories is The Capital of Kansas City (BkMk Press, 2016). He has received Pushcart Prizes in fiction and nonfiction, and the Iowa Poetry Prize for The Bunker in the Parsley Fields (University of Iowa Press). Gildner and his wife Michele live in the Clearwater Mountains of Idaho and in the foothills of Arizona’s Santa Catalina Mountains.