Letter to New Zealand

Alice Friman’s seventh collection of poetry is Blood Weather, forthcoming from Louisiana State University Press in 2019. She’s the winner of a Pushcart Prize and is included in Best American Poetry. New work is forthcoming in PloughsharesPlume, Shenandoah, Western Humanities Review, and others. She lives in Milledgeville, Georgia, where she was poet-in-residence at Georgia College and State University.

The Dew-Tasters; Drosophila; & Through Gumroot Swamp

Lola Haskins’s latest collection of poems, her fifteenth, is Asylum: Improvisations on John Clare (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2019).

Wild

Gary Gildner has contributed to The Georgia Review numerous poems and stories, four essays, a book review, and an exchange of letters with the late novelist Raymond Andrews. His latest collection of poems is Cleaning a Rainbow (BkMk Press, 2007); his latest collection of stories is The Capital of Kansas City (BkMk Press, 2016). He has received Pushcart Prizes in fiction and nonfiction, and the Iowa Poetry Prize for The Bunker in the Parsley Fields (University of Iowa Press). Gildner and his wife Michele live in the Clearwater Mountains of Idaho and in the foothills of Arizona’s Santa Catalina Mountains.

Sky Riders

Jack Driscoll’s latest collection, The Goat Fish and the Lover’s Knot (Wayne State University Press, 2017), received the 2018 Michigan Library Foundation Award for fiction. His forthcoming “New & Selected” will include eleven stories previously published in The Georgia Review and dating back to 1987. He currently teaches in Pacific University’s low-residency MFA program in Oregon.

The Lobster Mafia Story

Anna Solomon is a graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and a resident of Brooklyn. Her story “Lotto,” first published in The Georgia Review (Summer 2006), received a Pushcart Prize in 2008. Other fiction has appeared in One Story, Harvard Review, Shenandoah, and Alaska Quarterly Review; her nonfiction has appeared in the New York Times Magazine. Solomon’s first novel, The Little Bride, will be out from Riverhead in 2011.

Franz Schubert Dreamt of Indians

Laura Sewell Matter is an essayist and teacher who lives in New Mexico. Her work has been anthologized in Best Creative Nonfiction and published in various literary journals, including The Georgia Review.

Questions of Transport: Reading Primo Levi Reading Dante

Anne Goldman’s fiction and nonfiction have appeared in Tin House, the Guardian, The Georgia Review, the Gettysburg Review, and the Southwest Review, among other venues. Her essays have been named as notable in Best American Essays, Best American Science and Nature Writing, and the Best American Travel Writing. Nominated for a National Magazine Award, she is the recipient of fellowships from the Ahmanson/Getty Foundation and grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Woodrow Wilson Foundation. Goldman is Professor of English at Sonoma State University. She is at work upon a second nonfiction manuscript, “An Aria for Insects and Other Essays.”

My Fall into Knowledge

Reg Saner’s prose and poetry have appeared in more than a hundred and fifty literary magazines and in over sixty anthologies. Among other honors, his previous writings, all set in the American West, have won several national prizes. His poetry collection, Climbing into the Roots (1976) received the first Walt Whitman Award as conferred by the Academy of American Poets and the Copernicus Society of America. His second book, So This Is the Map (1981), was a National Poetry Series “Open Competition” winner, selected by Derek Walcott. He has won a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship, the Creede Repertory Theater Award, the State of Colorado Governor’s Award, and has been an invited Resident Scholar at the Rockefeller Fondazione Culturale in Bellagio, Italyand received the Wallace Stegner Award conferred by the Center of the American West.

Tibet: A Reading List (on Xinran’s Sky Burial: An Epic Love Story of Tibet; Ma Jian’s Stick Out Your Tongue; Tubten Khétsun’s Memories of Life in Lhasa under Chinese Rule; Anne Carolyn Klein’s Meeting the Great Bliss Queen: Buddhists, Feminists, and the Art of the Self; Hildegard Diemberger’s When a Woman Becomes a Religious Dynasty: The Samding Dorje Phagmo of Tibet; Vic Mansfield’s Tibetan Buddhism and Modern Physics: Toward a Union of Love and Knowledge; Melvyn C. Goldstein’s A History of Modern Tibet, Vol. 2: The Calm Before the Storm, 1951–1955; Matthew T. Kapstein’s The Tibetans; Manosi Lahiri’s Here Be Yaks: Travels in Far Western Tibet; Patrick French’s Tibet, Tibet: A Personal History of a Lost Land; Robert Barnett’s Lhasa: Streets with Memories; and Authenticating Tibet: Answers to China’s 100 Questions, edited by Anne-Marie Blondeau and Katia Buffetrille)

Karen Swenson has published five volumes of poetry, been included in numerous anthologies, and appeared in The New Yorker, Saturday Review, Poetry, Commonweal, Miramar, The Nation, and other publications. Also the author of travel and political articles for the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times, Swenson presently lives in Barcelona, Spain.