Rock-a-Bye

Alice Friman’s poetry collections include Blood Weather (LSU Press, 2019), The View from Saturn (LSU Press, 2014), Vinculum (LSU Press, 2011), The Book of the Rotten Daughter (BkMk Press, 2006), Zoo (1999), Inverted Fire (1997), and Reporting from Corinth (1984). A recipient of many honors, including two Pushcart Prizes and inclusion in Best American Poetry, she has been published in Poetry, Ploughshares, The Georgia Review, Gettysburg Review, Plume, Crazyhorse, and others. She lives in Milledgeville, Georgia, where she was Poet-in-Residence at Georgia College. 

Where I Live

Maxine Kumin’s seventeenth poetry collection, Where I Live: New and Selected Poems 1990–2010 (W. W. Norton, 2010), won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize in 2011. Kumin’s other awards include the Pulitzer Prize, the Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize, the Poets’ Prize, and the Harvard Arts and Robert Frost medals. A former United States poet laureate, Kumin lives with her husband on a farm in the Mink Hills of New Hampshire, where they have raised horses for forty years and enjoyed the companionship of several rescued dogs.

Dr. Deneau’s Punishment

Mandala on a Walking Stick

Margaret Gibson is the current poet laureate of Connecticut and the author of twelve books of poems, all from Louisiana State University Press, most recently Not Hearing the Wood Thrush (2018) and The Glass Globe (forthcoming in 2021), as well as a memoir, The Prodigal Daughter (University of Missouri Press, 2008). The Vigil (1993) was a finalist for the National Book Award in Poetry; Broken Cup (2016) was a finalist for the Poets’ Prize, and its title poem won a Pushcart Prize that year. Gibson is professor emerita at the University of Connecticut.

The Hammock Knot & On a Snowy Morning I Think of Michelangelo

Keith Ratzlaff teaches poetry and literature at Central College in Pella, Iowa. His most recent books of poetry, Then, A Thousand Crows (2009) and Dubious Angels: Poems after Paul Klee (2005), are from Anhinga Press, as will be his next, Who’s Asking? His poems and reviews have appeared recently in the Cincinnati Review, Arts and Letters, Colorado Review, and the American Reader; his honors include the Theodore Roethke Award, two Pushcart Prizes, and inclusion in The Best American Poetry 2009. 

This Poem Had Better Be about the World We Actually Live In

David Clewell is the author of several collections of poems—most recently, Taken Somehow By Surprise (University of Wisconsin, 2011). He teaches writing and literature at Webster University in St. Louis and served as Missouri’s poet laureate from 2010–12. His claim to Charlie-the-Tuna-collecting fame is not at all overinflated.

Solo Act

Chris Forhan is the author of three books of poetry: Black Leapt In (2009), winner of the Barrow Street Press Poetry Prize; The Actual Moon, The Actual Stars (2003), winner of the Morse Poetry Prize and a Washington State Book Award; and Forgive Us Our Happiness (1999), winner of the Bakeless Prize. A professor at Butler University, he is the recipient of an NEA fellowship and two Pushcart Prizes.

Culture, Biology, and Emergence

Alison Hawthorne Deming is the author of A Woven World: On Fashion, Fishermen, and the Sardine Dress (Counterpoint Press, 2021). Her other recent books include Zoologies: On Animals and the Human Spirit (Milkweed Editions, 2014) and the poetry collection Stairway to Heaven (Penguin, 2016). The recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Wallace Stegner Fellowship, National Endowment for the Arts fellowships, and the Walt Whitman Award, she is Regents Professor at the University of Arizona. She lives in Tucson and on Grand Manan Island, New Brunswick, Canada.

Pieces toward a Just Whole

Lauret Savoy works to unearth what is buried and to re-member what is fragmented, shattered, eroded. A woman of African American, Euro-American, and Native American heritage, she writes about this country’s origins and their varied places in our storytelling. She has written and edited many books, including Trace: Memory, History, Race, and the American Landscape (Counterpoint Press, 2015), which won the 2016 American Book Award from the Before Columbus Foundation; The Colors of Nature: Culture, Identity and the Natural World (Milkweed Editions, 2002); and Bedrock: Writers on the Wonders of Geology (Trinity University Press, 2006). Savoy is the David B. Truman Professor of Environmental Studies and Geology at Mount Holyoke College, a photographer, and a pilot. Winner of an Andrew Carnegie Fellowship, she has also held fellowships from the Smithsonian Institution and Yale University.

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