Listening and Speaking

Ellen Wilbur’s stories have been published widely in such journals as the Iowa Review and New Letters, and other new work is forthcoming in Yale Review and Harvard Review. Wilbur lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where she teaches at the Shady Hill School.

A Dark Light in the West: Racism and Reconciliation

Barry Lopez’s essays and fiction have been appearing in The Georgia Review since 1993; he was the keynote speaker at our third annual Earth Day Program in 2011, and for this year’s eleventh edition he will be our first repeat presenter. His Of Wolves and Men (1978) won the John Burroughs Medal for Nature Writing and was a finalist for the National Book Award—which his Arctic Dreams (1986) won. Lopez’s numerous short-story collections include Outside (Trinity University Press, 2015) and Resistance (Vintage, 2004); also among his more than a dozen volumes are the novella-length fable Crow and Weasel (1990) and (with Debra Gwartney) Home Ground: Language for an American Landscape (Trinity University Press, 2006). A world traveler to more than seventy countries, Barry Lopez has lived for decades on the upper McKenzie River in Oregon.

Raymond Andrews and the Welcome Table

Judy Long is an editor and publicist with more than two decades of experience in bookselling and publishing. She owns Byhalia Media, a book marketing company, and Byhalia Books, a book retailing business; she serves on the boards of the Stanley W. Lindberg Award and the Athens Historical Society; and she is the editor of numerous anthologies, including Literary New Orleans (Hill Street Press, 2000).

Becoming Writers Together

Philip Lee Williams (b. 1950) is the author of seventeen books, among them twelve novels, three works of nonfiction, and two volumes of poetry. His latest novel, Emerson’s Brother (Mercer University Press, 2012), is about the mentally challenged brother of Ralph Waldo Emerson; a thousand-page novel, The Divine Comics (2011), is a modern re-imagining and updating of Dante’s Divine Comedy; and The Flower Seeker: An Epic Poem of William Bartram (2010) was named Book of the Year by Books & Culture magazine. Williams’ books have been translated into Swedish, German, French, and Japanese and have appeared in large-print editions as well. A science writer and a teacher of creative writing at the University of Georgia for many years, Williams retired in 2012. He lives with his family in rural Oconee County, Georgia. (Inducted in 2010)

Laughs Last

Mary Hood, 2014 inductee to the Georgia Writers Hall of Fame, is the author of the novel Familiar Heat (1995) and the short-story collections And Venus Is Blue (1986) and How Far She Went (1984). A new collection of stories, A Clear View of the Southern Sky, is forthcoming from the University of South Carolina Press in 2015.

“What a Nice Surprise”—A Correspondence

Raymond Andrews (1934–1991) was born in, and grew up near, the town of Madison. After serving four years in the United States Air Force and then attending Michigan State University, he lived in New York City from 1958 to 1984. Andrews won the James Baldwin Prize for his debut novel, Appalachee Red (1978)—the first volume of his Muskhogean County trilogy that also includes Rosiebelle Lee Wildcat Tennessee (1980) and Baby Sweet’s (1983). His other books include a memoir, The Last Radio Baby (1990), and a two-novella volume, Jessie and Jesus and Cousin Claire (1991). Andrews returned to Georgia from New York in 1984, living just outside of Athens until he took his own life in 1991. The Fall 2010 issue of The Georgia Review includes a major feature on his work. (Inducted in 2009)

Gary Gildner has contributed to The Georgia Review numerous poems and stories, four essays, a book review, and an exchange of letters with the late novelist Raymond Andrews. His latest collection of poems is Cleaning a Rainbow (BkMk Press, 2007); his latest collection of stories is The Capital of Kansas City (BkMk Press, 2016). He has received Pushcart Prizes in fiction and nonfiction, and the Iowa Poetry Prize for The Bunker in the Parsley Fields (University of Iowa Press). Gildner and his wife Michele live in the Clearwater Mountains of Idaho and in the foothills of Arizona’s Santa Catalina Mountains.

Remembering Raymond Andrews

Gary Gildner has contributed to The Georgia Review numerous poems and stories, four essays, a book review, and an exchange of letters with the late novelist Raymond Andrews. His latest collection of poems is Cleaning a Rainbow (BkMk Press, 2007); his latest collection of stories is The Capital of Kansas City (BkMk Press, 2016). He has received Pushcart Prizes in fiction and nonfiction, and the Iowa Poetry Prize for The Bunker in the Parsley Fields (University of Iowa Press). Gildner and his wife Michele live in the Clearwater Mountains of Idaho and in the foothills of Arizona’s Santa Catalina Mountains.

From 99 Years and a Dark Day (novel excerpt, with an introduction by Brennan Collins)

Raymond Andrews (1934–1991) was born in, and grew up near, the town of Madison. After serving four years in the United States Air Force and then attending Michigan State University, he lived in New York City from 1958 to 1984. Andrews won the James Baldwin Prize for his debut novel, Appalachee Red (1978)—the first volume of his Muskhogean County trilogy that also includes Rosiebelle Lee Wildcat Tennessee (1980) and Baby Sweet’s (1983). His other books include a memoir, The Last Radio Baby (1990), and a two-novella volume, Jessie and Jesus and Cousin Claire (1991). Andrews returned to Georgia from New York in 1984, living just outside of Athens until he took his own life in 1991. The Fall 2010 issue of The Georgia Review includes a major feature on his work. (Inducted in 2009)

Satan Sun (memoir excerpt)

Raymond Andrews (1934–1991) was born in, and grew up near, the town of Madison. After serving four years in the United States Air Force and then attending Michigan State University, he lived in New York City from 1958 to 1984. Andrews won the James Baldwin Prize for his debut novel, Appalachee Red (1978)—the first volume of his Muskhogean County trilogy that also includes Rosiebelle Lee Wildcat Tennessee (1980) and Baby Sweet’s (1983). His other books include a memoir, The Last Radio Baby (1990), and a two-novella volume, Jessie and Jesus and Cousin Claire (1991). Andrews returned to Georgia from New York in 1984, living just outside of Athens until he took his own life in 1991. The Fall 2010 issue of The Georgia Review includes a major feature on his work. (Inducted in 2009)