Early Morning, Downtown 1 Train

Rebecca McClanahan is the author of ten books, most recently The Tribal Knot: A Memoir of Family, Community, and a Century of Change (Indiana University Press, 2013) and a revised edition of Word Painting: The Fine Art of Writing Descriptively (Writer’s Digest Books, 2014). Her work has appeared in Best American Essays, Best American Poetry, Kenyon Review, The Georgia Review, and The Sun, and in anthologies published by Doubleday, Norton, Putnam, Penguin, Beacon, St. Martin’s, and numerous others.

Lightening & Jaundice

The Speed of Dark

Lynn Schmeidler’s “Being Stevie” is her third story to appear in The Georgia Review (see also Spring 2013 and Summer 2009). Her fiction has appeared or is forthcoming in the Southern Review, Mid-American Review, Opium, Southeast Review, Chelsea and other literary magazines. Her poetry chapbook Curiouser & Curiouser won the 2013 Grayson Books Chapbook Contest. She teaches at the Hudson Valley Writers Center in Sleepy Hollow, NY, and is at work on a story collection and a book of poetry.

Anniversary

Joe Wilkins is the author of a memoir, The Mountain and the Fathers: Growing Up on the Big Dry (Counterpoint, 2013), winner of a 2014 GLCA New Writers Award—an honor that has previously recognized early work by the likes of Richard Ford, Louise Erdrich, and Alice Munro. He also has three books of poems, most recently When We Were Birds (University of Arkansas Press, 2016), winner of the 2017 Stafford/Hall Prize in Poetry from the Oregon Book Awards. His debut novel, And Ever These Bull Mountains, will be published by Little, Brown in the spring of 2018. Wilkins lives with his family in western Oregon, where he teaches writing at Linfield College.

The Way We Have Become: A Surfeit of Seeming

My Dog Has No Nose & Despair Brings the Dog

Todd Boss’s poetry collections are Pitch (2012) and Yellowrocket (2008), both from W. W. Norton. His 35-part “Fragments for the 35W Bridge” was part of a collaboration with Swedish artist Maja Spasova called “Project 35W,” an August 2012 art installation on the Mississippi River. Panic, his verse retelling of Knut Hamsun’s 1894 novella Pan, will premiere as a one-man opera in late 2013, arranged by Boston Conservatory’s Andy Vores. Boss is a founding co-director of Motionpoems, a leading producer of poetry films—now in collaboration with Copper Canyon, Milkweed, Graywolf, and other publishers.

True Heart

Judith Kitchen passed away on 6 November 2014, just days after completing work on the essay-review in Spring 2015 Georgia Review. The contributor’s note she supplied read as follows: “Judith Kitchen has three new forthcoming essays—in the Harvard Review, Great River Review, and River Teeth. Her most recent book, The Circus Train, was the lead publication in a new venture—Ovenbird Books, at ovenbirdbooks.org.” To that we respectfully add this brief overview of her writing and teaching career: Kitchen began as a poet, publishing the volume Perennials as the winner of the 1985 Anhinga Press Poetry Prize. She then shifted to prose writing of several sorts, with emphases on essays and reviews. Her four essay volumes are Only the Dance: Essays on Time and Memory (University of South Carolina Press, 1994); Distance and Direction (Graywolf Press, 2002); Half in Shade: Family, Photographs, and Fate (Coffee House Press, 2012); and The Circus Train (Ovenbird Books, 2013)—which appeared first, almost in its entirety, in the Summer 2013 issue of The Georgia Review. In 1998 Kitchen published a critical study, Writing the World: Understanding William Stafford (University of Oregon Press), and in 2002 a novel, The House on Eccles Road (Graywolf Press). She also conceived and edited three important collections of brief nonfiction pieces, all published by W. W. Norton: In Short (1996), In Brief (1999), and Short Takes (2005)—the first two coedited by Mary Paumier Jones. Kitchen also founded State Street Press in the early 1980s, bringing out over the next twenty years seventy-six poetry chapbooks, two pamphlets, five full-length poetry volumes, two collections of translations, and a poetry anthology—the State Street Reader. After teaching for many years at SUNY-Brockport—not all that far from her birthplace of Painted Post, NY—Judith retired and moved with her husband Stan Sanvel Rubin to Port Townsend, WA, from which they founded and co-directed for a decade the Rainier Writing Workshop low-residency MFA program at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma. The collection What Persists
Selected Essays on Poetry from The Georgia Review, 1988–2014 was published by the University of Georgia Press in 2015.

Finches or Sparrows

Andrea Hollander’s first published poem appeared in the Winter 1982 issue of The Georgia Review. Her first full-length poetry collection won the 1993 Nicholas Roerich Poetry Prize; her fourth was a finalist for the 2014 Oregon Book Award. Her many other honors include two Pushcart Prizes (in poetry and creative nonfiction) and two fellowships in poetry from the National Endowment for the Arts. After living in the woods of the Arkansas Ozarks for thirty-five years, she moved to downtown Portland, Oregon, in 2011.

Fig & The Barricade

LaWanda Walters is the author of a forthcoming book of poems, Light Is the Odalisque, selected by Pamela Uschuk and William Pitt Root for the Silver Concho Series at Press 53. Her “Goodness in Mississippi,” originally published in The Georgia Review (Winter 2013) was chosen by Sherman Alexie for Best American Poetry 2015.

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