on Tillie Olsen: One Woman, Many Riddles by Panthea Reid

Myles Weber’s literary criticism appears frequently in The Georgia Review and many other journals, including New England Review, Kenyon Review, Sewanee Review, Salmagundi, and Michigan Quarterly Review. Associate professor of English at Winona State University in Minnesota, Weber is the author of Consuming Silences: How We Read Authors Who Don’t Publish (University of Georgia Press, 2005) and Middlebrow Annoyances: American Drama in the 21st Century (Gival Press, 2003).

What’s the Story? (on Richard Bausch’s Something Is Out There; Joyce Carol Oates’s Sourland; Suzanne Rivecca’s Death Is Not an Option; & Tracy Daugherty’s One Day the Wind Changed)

Greg Johnson, whose reviews have appeared regularly in our pages across many years, has published two novels, five collections of short stories, and several volumes of nonfiction. He lives in Atlanta and teaches in the graduate writing program at Kennesaw State University.

If Not Us, Who? (on Michael McClure’s Mysteriosos and Other Poems; Brenda Hillman’s Practical Water; Mark Nowak’s Coal Mountain Elementary; Kazim Ali’s Bright Felon: Autobiography and Cities; Rachel Loden’s Dick of the Dead; and Brian Turner’s Phantom Noise)

Jeff Gundy’s eighth book of poems, Without a Plea, was published in early 2019 by Bottom Dog Press. Recent poems and essays are in Cincinnati Review, River Teeth, Forklift, Ohio, Terrain, and Christian Century. He is at work on a series of lyric essays about the Illinois prairie with the working title “Wind Farm.”

 

Message

Robert Wrigley, Distinguished Professor Emeritus at the University of Idaho, lives in the high-mountain woods near Moscow. His eleventh and most recent book of poems is Box (Penguin, 2017).

Talk Radio

Fleda Brown’s The Woods Are On Fire: New & Selected Poems will be out from the University of Nebraska Press in 2017. A former poet laureate of Delaware, she lives in Traverse City, Michigan, and is on the faculty of the Rainier Writing Workshop, a low-residency MFA program in Tacoma, Washington. 

In the wild & Having weighed the issues

Bob Hicok’s ninth book, Hold, is just out from Copper Canyon Press.

Forecast

Melanie McCabe’s work has appeared on Poetry Daily, as well as in Best New Poets 2010, The Georgia Review, Massachusetts Review, Cincinnati Review, and Shenandoah; her collection History of the Body will be published by WordTech Communications in 2012. McCabe teaches high school English and creative writing in Arlington, Virginia.

Crude Articulation

Chris Forhan is the author of three books of poetry: Black Leapt In (2009), winner of the Barrow Street Press Poetry Prize; The Actual Moon, The Actual Stars (2003), winner of the Morse Poetry Prize and a Washington State Book Award; and Forgive Us Our Happiness (1999), winner of the Bakeless Prize. A professor at Butler University, he is the recipient of an NEA fellowship and two Pushcart Prizes.

Diogenes

Michael Waters’s recent and forthcoming books include The Dean of Discipline (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2018), Celestial Joyride (BOA Editions, 2016), and a coedited anthology, Reel Verse: Poems about the Movies (Knopf, 2019). A 2017 Guggenheim Fellow, Waters teaches at Monmouth University and for the Drew University MFA program. He is also the recipient of five Pushcart Prizes and fellowships from the NEA, the Fulbright Foundation, and the New Jersey State Council on the Arts.