Laughs Last

Mary Hood, 2014 inductee to the Georgia Writers Hall of Fame, is the author of the novel Familiar Heat (1995) and the short-story collections And Venus Is Blue (1986) and How Far She Went (1984). A new collection of stories, A Clear View of the Southern Sky, is forthcoming from the University of South Carolina Press in 2015.

“What a Nice Surprise”—A Correspondence

Raymond Andrews (1934–1991) was born in, and grew up near, the town of Madison. After serving four years in the United States Air Force and then attending Michigan State University, he lived in New York City from 1958 to 1984. Andrews won the James Baldwin Prize for his debut novel, Appalachee Red (1978)—the first volume of his Muskhogean County trilogy that also includes Rosiebelle Lee Wildcat Tennessee (1980) and Baby Sweet’s (1983). His other books include a memoir, The Last Radio Baby (1990), and a two-novella volume, Jessie and Jesus and Cousin Claire (1991). Andrews returned to Georgia from New York in 1984, living just outside of Athens until he took his own life in 1991. The Fall 2010 issue of The Georgia Review includes a major feature on his work. (Inducted in 2009)

Gary Gildner has contributed to The Georgia Review numerous poems and stories, four essays, a book review, and an exchange of letters with the late novelist Raymond Andrews. His latest collection of poems is Cleaning a Rainbow (BkMk Press, 2007); his latest collection of stories is The Capital of Kansas City (BkMk Press, 2016). He has received Pushcart Prizes in fiction and nonfiction, and the Iowa Poetry Prize for The Bunker in the Parsley Fields (University of Iowa Press). Gildner and his wife Michele live in the Clearwater Mountains of Idaho and in the foothills of Arizona’s Santa Catalina Mountains.

Remembering Raymond Andrews

Gary Gildner has contributed to The Georgia Review numerous poems and stories, four essays, a book review, and an exchange of letters with the late novelist Raymond Andrews. His latest collection of poems is Cleaning a Rainbow (BkMk Press, 2007); his latest collection of stories is The Capital of Kansas City (BkMk Press, 2016). He has received Pushcart Prizes in fiction and nonfiction, and the Iowa Poetry Prize for The Bunker in the Parsley Fields (University of Iowa Press). Gildner and his wife Michele live in the Clearwater Mountains of Idaho and in the foothills of Arizona’s Santa Catalina Mountains.

From 99 Years and a Dark Day (novel excerpt, with an introduction by Brennan Collins)

Raymond Andrews (1934–1991) was born in, and grew up near, the town of Madison. After serving four years in the United States Air Force and then attending Michigan State University, he lived in New York City from 1958 to 1984. Andrews won the James Baldwin Prize for his debut novel, Appalachee Red (1978)—the first volume of his Muskhogean County trilogy that also includes Rosiebelle Lee Wildcat Tennessee (1980) and Baby Sweet’s (1983). His other books include a memoir, The Last Radio Baby (1990), and a two-novella volume, Jessie and Jesus and Cousin Claire (1991). Andrews returned to Georgia from New York in 1984, living just outside of Athens until he took his own life in 1991. The Fall 2010 issue of The Georgia Review includes a major feature on his work. (Inducted in 2009)

Satan Sun (memoir excerpt)

Raymond Andrews (1934–1991) was born in, and grew up near, the town of Madison. After serving four years in the United States Air Force and then attending Michigan State University, he lived in New York City from 1958 to 1984. Andrews won the James Baldwin Prize for his debut novel, Appalachee Red (1978)—the first volume of his Muskhogean County trilogy that also includes Rosiebelle Lee Wildcat Tennessee (1980) and Baby Sweet’s (1983). His other books include a memoir, The Last Radio Baby (1990), and a two-novella volume, Jessie and Jesus and Cousin Claire (1991). Andrews returned to Georgia from New York in 1984, living just outside of Athens until he took his own life in 1991. The Fall 2010 issue of The Georgia Review includes a major feature on his work. (Inducted in 2009)

Raymond Andrews (1934–91): The County as Heart, History, and Universe (an introduction)

Doug Carlson joined the Review staff in January 2007 and works primarily in manuscript evaluation and nonfiction editing. Carlson’s essays on natural and cultural history have appeared frequently in magazines and journals as well as in several anthologies, including A Place Apart (W. W. Norton) and The Sacred Place (University of Utah Press). His work has been collected in two books: At the Edge (White Pine Press) and When We Say We’re Home (University of Utah Press). His most recent book, Roger Tory Peterson: A Biography, was published by the University of Texas Press in 2007. Before coming to the Review, Carlson was visiting writer-in-residence at Concordia College in Moorhead, Minnesota. He is a former chair of the UGA Press Faculty Editorial Board and has served in editorial or advisory capacities for Ascent magazine, White Pine Press, and New Rivers Press.

Stephen Corey joined the staff of The Georgia Review in 1983 as assistant editor and subsequently served as associate editor, acting editor, and, from 2008 to his retirement in 2019, editor. His most recent book is Startled at the Big Sound: Essays Personal, Literary, and Cultural (Mercer University Press, 2017); he has also published nine collections of poems, among them There Is No Finished World (White Pine Press) and Synchronized Swimming (Livingston Press); his individual poems, essays, and reviews have appeared in dozens of periodicals; and he has coedited three books in as many genres, including (with Warren Slesinger) Spreading the Word: Editors on Poetry (The Bench Press). In the spring of 2022, White Pine Press will bring out his As My Age Then Was, So I Understood Them: New and Selected Poems.

on Tillie Olsen: One Woman, Many Riddles by Panthea Reid

Myles Weber’s literary criticism appears frequently in The Georgia Review and many other journals, including New England Review, Kenyon Review, Sewanee Review, Salmagundi, and Michigan Quarterly Review. Associate professor of English at Winona State University in Minnesota, Weber is the author of Consuming Silences: How We Read Authors Who Don’t Publish (University of Georgia Press, 2005) and Middlebrow Annoyances: American Drama in the 21st Century (Gival Press, 2003).

What’s the Story? (on Richard Bausch’s Something Is Out There; Joyce Carol Oates’s Sourland; Suzanne Rivecca’s Death Is Not an Option; & Tracy Daugherty’s One Day the Wind Changed)

Greg Johnson, whose reviews have appeared regularly in our pages across many years, has published two novels, five collections of short stories, and several volumes of nonfiction. He lives in Atlanta and teaches in the graduate writing program at Kennesaw State University.

If Not Us, Who? (on Michael McClure’s Mysteriosos and Other Poems; Brenda Hillman’s Practical Water; Mark Nowak’s Coal Mountain Elementary; Kazim Ali’s Bright Felon: Autobiography and Cities; Rachel Loden’s Dick of the Dead; and Brian Turner’s Phantom Noise)

Jeff Gundy’s eighth book of poems, Without a Plea, was published in early 2019 by Bottom Dog Press. Recent poems and essays are in Cincinnati Review, River Teeth, Forklift, Ohio, Terrain, and Christian Century. He is at work on a series of lyric essays about the Illinois prairie with the working title “Wind Farm.”