From Wariness to Wishfulness: Disney’s Emasculation of Pinocchio’s Conscience

David Bosworth’s two most recent books, historical studies of cultural change, are The Demise of Virtue in Virtual America: The Moral Origins of the Great Recession (Front Porch Republic, 2014) and Conscientious Thinking: Making Sense in an Age of Idiot Savants (University of Georgia Press, 2017). A resident of Seattle, he is a professor in (and the former director of) the University of Washington’s creative-writing program.

A Cave in a Cliff in Scotland

Albert Goldbarth is the author of more than twenty-five books of poetry, most recently Selfish (2015), Everyday People (2012), and The Kitchen Sink: New and Selected Poems, 1972–2007 (2007), all from Graywolf Press. He has twice won the National Book Critics Circle Award in Poetry.

The Makings

Kent Meyers has published a memoir, a book of short fiction, and three novels, two of which have been listed as New York Times Notable Books. (The most recent is Twisted Tree, released in 2009). His work has won numerous honors, including a Society of Midland Authors Award and a High Plains Book Award. Meyers has published fiction and essays in various literary journals and magazines, including Harper’s and (several times) The Georgia Review. He lives in Spearfish, South Dakota, and teaches in Pacific Lutheran University’s low-residency MFA program, the Rainier Writing Workshop.

on J. D. Salinger: A Life by Kenneth Slawenski

Myles Weber’s literary criticism appears frequently in The Georgia Review and many other journals, including New England Review, Kenyon Review, Sewanee Review, Salmagundi, and Michigan Quarterly Review. Associate professor of English at Winona State University in Minnesota, Weber is the author of Consuming Silences: How We Read Authors Who Don’t Publish (University of Georgia Press, 2005) and Middlebrow Annoyances: American Drama in the 21st Century (Gival Press, 2003).

The Agony of Victory (on Brian Christian’s The Most Human Human: What Talking with Computers Teaches Us About What It Means to Be Alive & Joshua Foer’s Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything)

Baynard Woods is the author of Coffin Point: The Strange Cases of Ed McTeer, Witchdoctor Sheriff (River City Publishing, 2010). He is editor-at-large and a columnist at the Baltimore City Paper, and his work has appeared in the New York Times, McSweeney’s, and numerous other publications. He is writing a book about people who believe in the Greek gods.

Tradecraft (on Adam Foulds’s The Broken Word; Melissa Range’s Horse and Rider; Nick Lantz’s We Don’t Know We Don’t Know; & Alice Friman’s Vinculum)

Judith Kitchen passed away on 6 November 2014, just days after completing work on the essay-review in Spring 2015 Georgia Review. The contributor’s note she supplied read as follows: “Judith Kitchen has three new forthcoming essays—in the Harvard Review, Great River Review, and River Teeth. Her most recent book, The Circus Train, was the lead publication in a new venture—Ovenbird Books, at ovenbirdbooks.org.” To that we respectfully add this brief overview of her writing and teaching career: Kitchen began as a poet, publishing the volume Perennials as the winner of the 1985 Anhinga Press Poetry Prize. She then shifted to prose writing of several sorts, with emphases on essays and reviews. Her four essay volumes are Only the Dance: Essays on Time and Memory (University of South Carolina Press, 1994); Distance and Direction (Graywolf Press, 2002); Half in Shade: Family, Photographs, and Fate (Coffee House Press, 2012); and The Circus Train (Ovenbird Books, 2013)—which appeared first, almost in its entirety, in the Summer 2013 issue of The Georgia Review. In 1998 Kitchen published a critical study, Writing the World: Understanding William Stafford (University of Oregon Press), and in 2002 a novel, The House on Eccles Road (Graywolf Press). She also conceived and edited three important collections of brief nonfiction pieces, all published by W. W. Norton: In Short (1996), In Brief (1999), and Short Takes (2005)—the first two coedited by Mary Paumier Jones. Kitchen also founded State Street Press in the early 1980s, bringing out over the next twenty years seventy-six poetry chapbooks, two pamphlets, five full-length poetry volumes, two collections of translations, and a poetry anthology—the State Street Reader. After teaching for many years at SUNY-Brockport—not all that far from her birthplace of Painted Post, NY—Judith retired and moved with her husband Stan Sanvel Rubin to Port Townsend, WA, from which they founded and co-directed for a decade the Rainier Writing Workshop low-residency MFA program at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma. The collection What Persists
Selected Essays on Poetry from The Georgia Review, 1988–2014 was published by the University of Georgia Press in 2015.

To Alchemy

Lance Larsen is a former poet laureate of Utah and the author of five collections, most recently What the Body Knows (Tampa Press, 2017). He has won a number of awards, including a Pushcart Prize and a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship. A professor at BYU, he recently co-directed a theater study abroad program in London.

Cellar Music

William Johnson is the author of three poetry collections, including Out of the Ruins (Confluence Press, 1999), chosen as the Idaho Book of the Year; What Thoreau Said (1991), a critical study of Walden; and, most recently, the essay collection A River without Banks (Oregon State University Press, 2010). He has received a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship in poetry, served twice as Idaho Writer-in-Residence, the state’s highest literary honor, and is professor emeritus at Lewis-Clark State College in Lewiston, Idaho.

Waiting-for-a-Diagnosis Suite

Christine Robbins, who is making her third appearance in our pages, has poems published or forthcoming in Barrow Street, the Missouri Review online, Willow Springs, and elsewhere. She received an MFA in creative writing from the Rainier Writing Workshop and has lived in Olympia, Washington, for most of her life.