Improving My Mind & Casting Aspersions

David Wagoner has published nineteen books of poems—most recently After the Point of No Return (Copper Canyon Press, 2012)—and ten novels, including The Escape Artist (1965), which Francis Ford Coppola made into a movie in 1982. Winner of the Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize and many other honors, he was a chancellor of the Academy of American Poets for twenty-three years, edited Poetry Northwest from 1966 to 2002, and is professor emeritus of English at the University of Washington. He teaches in the low-residency MFA program of the Whidbey Island Writers Workshop.

The Statue of Responsibility & The Operation

Stephen Dunn is the author of numerous books of poetry and prose. His Degrees of Fidelity: Essays on Poetry and the Latitudes of the Personal,  is due out from Tiger Bark Press in October 2018, and a new collection of poems, Pagan Virtues, is scheduled to be published by W. W. Norton in 2019. He has been the recipient of many awards, including the 2001 Pulitzer Prize in Poetry for Different Hours, and he has had fellowships from the Guggenheim and Rockefeller foundations. Dunn lives in Frostburg, Maryland, with his wife, the writer Barbara Hurd.

La Mer de L’Ouest

Kent Nelson has identified 767 species of North American birds and has traveled to the most remote areas of the U.S. and Canada, including Attu (the last Aleutian Island), the Dry Tortugas, and Newfoundland. His story collection, The Spirit Bird (University of Pittsburgh Press), won the 2014 Drue Heinz Literature Prize. “Out of the Darkness” is one of seven linked works in a collection-in-progress, “Charleston Stories,” three of which have appeared in The Georgia Review. He lives in Ouray, Colorado.

Out of the Mouths of Babes

Monica McFawn’s stories have appeared or are forthcoming in Conjunctions, Gargoyle, Passages North, Hotel Amerika, Harpur Palate, and other journals; she reviews fiction for Rain Taxi and the Quarterly Conversation. She teaches writing at Grand Valley State University in Michigan and in her spare time rides dressage on her Welsh pony, Eragon.

Insider’s Almanac

Krista Eastman’s work has appeared most recently in Massachusetts Review, Cutbank, and Hayden’s Ferry Review; her honors include the Kay W. Levin Short Nonfiction Award from the Council for Wisconsin Writers and the Katey Lehman Fellowship from Pennsylvania State University. She lives in Madison, Wisconsin.

Sheltered: Finding Home through the Art of Mary Brodbeck

Heather Sellers is the author of the memoir You Don’t Look Like Anyone I Know (Riverhead Books, 2010), a New York Times Book Review Editor’s Choice; three volumes of poetry; a children’s book; and a collection of short stories, Georgia Under Water (2001). A new edition of her textbook, The Practice of Creative Writing (Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2008), is set for imminent release.

The Way of Imagination

Scott Russell Sanders lives in the hill country of southern Indiana, where he has written more than twenty books of fiction and nonfiction, including A Conservationist Manifesto (Indiana University Press, 2009) and Hunting for Hope (Beacon Press, 1998). His most recent books (also from IU Press) are Stone Country: Then & Now (2017), a documentary narrative made in collaboration with photographer Jeffrey Wolin, and Dancing in Dreamtime (2016), a collection of eco-science-fiction stories. He is currently finishing his portion of Ordinary Wealth, fifty brief tales written in response to photographs by Peter Forbes.

on Monopolizing the Master: Henry James and the Politics of Modern Literary Scholarship by Michael Anesko

Linda Simon’s many critical and biographical books range from Coco Chanel (Reaktion Books, 2011) to Dark Light: Electricity and Anxiety from the Telegraph to the X-ray (2004) to Thornton Wilder, His World (1979). A past president of the William James Society and general editor of the journal William James Studies, Simon is a professor of English at Skidmore College.

on Stella Adler on America’s Master Playwrights: Eugene O’Neill, Thornton Wilder, Clifford Odets, William Saroyan, Tennessee Williams, William Inge, Arthur Miller, Edward Albee, edited by Barry Paris

Myles Weber’s literary criticism appears frequently in The Georgia Review and many other journals, including New England Review, Kenyon Review, Sewanee Review, Salmagundi, and Michigan Quarterly Review. Associate professor of English at Winona State University in Minnesota, Weber is the author of Consuming Silences: How We Read Authors Who Don’t Publish (University of Georgia Press, 2005) and Middlebrow Annoyances: American Drama in the 21st Century (Gival Press, 2003).