Art and Anguish: Elizabeth Hardwick’s Letters to Robert Lowell

Jeffrey Meyers, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, has recently published Thomas Mann’s Artist-Heroes (Northwestern University Press, 2014), Remembering Iris Murdoch (Palgrave Pivot, 2013), and the paperback edition of Scott Fitzgerald: A Biography (Harper Perennial, 2014). Thirty of his books have been translated into fourteen languages and seven alphabets, and published on six continents. In 2012 he gave the Seymour lectures on biography, sponsored by the National Library of Australia, in Canberra, Melbourne, and Sydney.

Poetry Now, and Some Thoughts on History, As If, Maybe, and No

Stephen Dunn is the author of numerous books of poetry and prose. His Degrees of Fidelity: Essays on Poetry and the Latitudes of the Personal,  is due out from Tiger Bark Press in October 2018, and a new collection of poems, Pagan Virtues, is scheduled to be published by W. W. Norton in 2019. He has been the recipient of many awards, including the 2001 Pulitzer Prize in Poetry for Different Hours, and he has had fellowships from the Guggenheim and Rockefeller foundations. Dunn lives in Frostburg, Maryland, with his wife, the writer Barbara Hurd.

on Agee at 100: Centennial Essays on the Works of James Agee edited by Michael A. Lofaro

Gary Kerley is a retired educator living in Bermuda Run, North Carolina. His reviews and articles have appeared in a number of publications and encyclopedias. An essay on the relationship between James Dickey and Pat Conroy and a review of Henry Taylor’s selected poems, This Tilted World Is Where I Live, will appear in the 2020 issue of The James Dickey Review. His articles on Alice Friman and William Walsh will appear next year on the online New Georgia Encyclopedia.

Canonicity and the New (on Lisa Lewis’ Burned House with Swimming Pool; David Wojahn’s World Tree; Susan Wood’s The Book of Ten; and Yusef Komunyakaa’s The Chameleon Couch)

Kevin Clark’s several books of poems include the forthcoming The Consecrations (Stephen F. Austin State University Press, 2021). His first collection, In the Evening of No Warning (New Issues Poetry and Prose, 2002), earned a grant from the Academy of American Poets, and his second, Self-Portrait with Expletives (2010), won the Pleiades Press prize. His poetry appears in the Southern Review, Ploughshares, Prairie Schooner, Iowa Review, Poetry Northwest, Gulf Coast, and Crazyhorse. A regular critic for The Georgia Review, he’s also published essays in the Southern Review, Papers on Language and Literature, and Contemporary Literary Criticism. He teaches at the Rainier Writing Workshop. 

The Song of the Unnameable Thing; Oh; An Explanation of the Mechanics of Her Marvelous Invention; My Personal Mythology; & 1,000 (Exactly)

Albert Goldbarth is the author of more than twenty-five books of poetry, most recently Selfish (2015), Everyday People (2012), and The Kitchen Sink: New and Selected Poems, 1972–2007 (2007), all from Graywolf Press. He has twice won the National Book Critics Circle Award in Poetry.

Aunt Nellie’s Walk & The Brain

Alice Friman’s seventh collection of poetry is Blood Weather, forthcoming from Louisiana State University Press in 2019. She’s the winner of a Pushcart Prize and is included in Best American Poetry. New work is forthcoming in PloughsharesPlume, Shenandoah, Western Humanities Review, and others. She lives in Milledgeville, Georgia, where she was poet-in-residence at Georgia College and State University.

Two Uncertainties

Lola Haskins’s latest collection of poems, her fifteenth, is Asylum: Improvisations on John Clare (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2019).

Portrait with Purple Shroud & Blue

Andrea Hollander’s first published poem appeared in the Winter 1982 issue of The Georgia Review. Her first full-length poetry collection won the 1993 Nicholas Roerich Poetry Prize; her fourth was a finalist for the 2014 Oregon Book Award. Her many other honors include two Pushcart Prizes (in poetry and creative nonfiction) and two fellowships in poetry from the National Endowment for the Arts. After living in the woods of the Arkansas Ozarks for thirty-five years, she moved to downtown Portland, Oregon, in 2011.

In 1966 Debbie Fuller Was Sweet on Pluto & At the Convention of State Librarians, I Should Have Been Preaching to the Choir

David Clewell is the author of several collections of poems—most recently, Taken Somehow By Surprise (University of Wisconsin, 2011). He teaches writing and literature at Webster University in St. Louis and served as Missouri’s poet laureate from 2010–12. His claim to Charlie-the-Tuna-collecting fame is not at all overinflated.