On the Silver Anniversary of a Heartbreak

Lynn Powell is the author of two books of poetry as well as a book of nonfiction, Framing Innocence: A Mother’s Photographs, A Prosecutor’s Zeal, and A Small Town’s Response (The New Press, 2010), which won the Studs and Ida Terkel Award. The recipient of fellowships from the NEA and the Ohio Arts Council, Powell has lived in Ohio since 1990 and currently teaches at Oberlin College.

Autumn

Sydney Lea’s thirteenth collection of poems, Here, is forthcoming from Four Way Books next year. Also due in 2018, from Vermont’s Green Writers Press, are Lea’s collected newspaper columns from his years as Vermont poet laureate, News That Stay News: Lyric and Everyday Life, his, and a re-issue of his collaborative book of essays with former Delaware poet laureate Fleda Brown, Growing Old in Poetry: Two Poets, Two Lives.

Postscript

Richard Bernstein’s “Wheeling and Dealing” and “Wheelman” mark his fourth appearance in The Georgia Review. A twelve-time recipient of the Bright Hill Press New York State Poetry Teacher of the Year Award, he is currently in his twenty-eighth year as a high school English, creative writing, and drama teacher in Norwich, New York. He also teaches courses in English and public speaking at Morrisville State College.

Coming or Going

Elton Glaser has published eight full-length collections of poetry, most recently two books in 2013: Translations from the Flesh (University of Pittsburgh Press) and The Law of Falling Bodies (University of Arkansas Press).

Coming to Terms

Alice Friman’s seventh collection of poetry is Blood Weather, forthcoming from Louisiana State University Press in 2019. She’s the winner of a Pushcart Prize and is included in Best American Poetry. New work is forthcoming in PloughsharesPlume, Shenandoah, Western Humanities Review, and others. She lives in Milledgeville, Georgia, where she was poet-in-residence at Georgia College and State University.

Play

Jill Osier’s recent work appears in Pleiades, the Southern Review, Southern Indiana Review, and West Branch. Her poem in The Georgia Review is part of a forthcoming chapbook, From.

Recovery

Richard Robbins has published five books of poems, including Other Americas (Blueroad Press, 2010) and Radioactive City (Bellday Books, 2009). The director of the creative writing program and the Good Thunder Reading Series at Minnesota State University–Mankato, Robbins has received awards from the Minnesota State Arts Board, the NEA, and the Poetry Society of America. He grew up in southern California and Montana, and he earned his MFA in creative writing at the University of Montana, where he studied with Richard Hugo and Madeline DeFrees.

The Secret; Everything All at Once; & At the Confederate Graveyard, Chattanooga

Richard Jackson has published fifteen books of poems and is the author or editor of multiple critical monographs, books in translation, and anthologies. His most recent books are Broken Horizons (Press 53, 2018) and Out of Place (Ashland Poetry Press, 2014); “Take Five,” a prose poetry project with four other poets, is forthcoming.

Two brothers

Albert Goldbarth is the author of more than twenty-five books of poetry, most recently Selfish (2015), Everyday People (2012), and The Kitchen Sink: New and Selected Poems, 1972–2007 (2007), all from Graywolf Press. He has twice won the National Book Critics Circle Award in Poetry.