Not Quite the End of Nature Writing

Doug Carlson joined the Review staff in January 2007 and works primarily in manuscript evaluation and nonfiction editing. Carlson’s essays on natural and cultural history have appeared frequently in magazines and journals as well as in several anthologies, including A Place Apart (W. W. Norton) and The Sacred Place (University of Utah Press). His work has been collected in two books: At the Edge (White Pine Press) and When We Say We’re Home (University of Utah Press). His most recent book, Roger Tory Peterson: A Biography, was published by the University of Texas Press in 2007. Before coming to the Review, Carlson was visiting writer-in-residence at Concordia College in Moorhead, Minnesota. He is a former chair of the UGA Press Faculty Editorial Board and has served in editorial or advisory capacities for Ascent magazine, White Pine Press, and New Rivers Press.

on Eric Sasson’s Margins of Tolerance

Siân Griffiths directs the creative writing program at Weber State University. Her work has appeared in Fifth Wednesday Journal, Ninth Letter, the Rumpus, Quarterly West, and many other publications. Her first novel, Borrowed Horses (New Rivers Press, 2013), was a semi-finalist for the 2014 VCU Cabell First Novelist Award.

on Al Maginnes’ Inventing Constellations

Floyd Collins earned his MFA and PhD at the University of Arkansas. A book of critical essays on poetry, The Living Artifact, is forthcoming from Stephen F. Austin University Press in spring 2021. The Teresa Poems will appear from Somondoco Press in fall 2021. His poetry and critical prose appear regularly with The Arkansas Review, The Georgia Review, The Gettysburg Review, and The Kenyon Review.

on Tim Kreider’s We Learn Nothing: Essays and Cartoons

Maura Mandyck, several of whose reviews have appeared previously in our pages, holds degrees in English from the University of Notre Dame and the University of Georgia, and in library science from the University of Alabama. She has worked as a librarian for the Nashville Public Library and for Athens Academy, and is now an instructional librarian at Spring Hill College, where she also teaches in the English department. She lives in Mobile, Alabama, with three dogs, two cats, and lots and lots of books.

on Selected Correspondence of Kenneth Patchen

Jeff Gundy’s eighth book of poems, Without a Plea, was published in early 2019 by Bottom Dog Press. Recent poems and essays are in Cincinnati Review, River Teeth, Forklift, Ohio, Terrain, and Christian Century. He is at work on a series of lyric essays about the Illinois prairie with the working title “Wind Farm.”

 

“If you don’t make it better I’ll stick pins in you” (on Pauline Kael’s The Age of Movies: Selected Writings of Pauline Kael, edited by Sanford Schwartz; and Brian Kellow’s Pauline Kael: A Life in the Dark)

Gerald Weales’s “American Theater Watch” appeared in these pages from 1978 until 2010, and we have also featured on occasion his essays and reviews on topics that have included World War II and the early-career political cartoons of one Theodore Geisel (a.k.a. Dr. Seuss). In addition to his distinguished career as an author and drama specialist, Weales was a longtime professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania, from which he retired in 1987; a senior Fulbright scholar at the University of Sri Lanka; and the recipient of a Guggenheim fellowship.

The Omega

Rebecca Cook writes prose and poetry and is especially interested in work that defies genre and labels, such as the lyric essay and the “fictitious” essay. She received her BA in English literature and her MA in rhetoric and composition from the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, where she currently teaches; in 2009 she completed her MFA in poetry and creative nonfiction at Vermont College of Fine Arts. She was a Bread Loaf Scholar in fiction in 2009, and she has a chapbook of poems, The Terrible Baby, available from Dancing Girl Press.

16 DOWN

Robert Wrigley, Distinguished Professor Emeritus at the University of Idaho, lives in the high-mountain woods near Moscow. His eleventh and most recent book of poems is Box (Penguin, 2017).

AMMO & EXPLOSIVES

Todd Boss’s poetry collections are Pitch (2012) and Yellowrocket (2008), both from W. W. Norton. His 35-part “Fragments for the 35W Bridge” was part of a collaboration with Swedish artist Maja Spasova called “Project 35W,” an August 2012 art installation on the Mississippi River. Panic, his verse retelling of Knut Hamsun’s 1894 novella Pan, will premiere as a one-man opera in late 2013, arranged by Boston Conservatory’s Andy Vores. Boss is a founding co-director of Motionpoems, a leading producer of poetry films—now in collaboration with Copper Canyon, Milkweed, Graywolf, and other publishers.