Still Life with Peaches

Lisa Knopp is the author of five books of creative nonfiction. Her most recent, What the River Carries: Encounters with the Mississippi, Missouri, and Platte (University of Missouri Press 2012), was the winner of the 2013 Nebraska Book Award for nonfiction/essay. Currently, she’s working on a collection called Like Salt or Love: Essays on Leaving Home, which will include “Still Life with Peaches.” Knopp is a professor of English at the University of Nebraska-Omaha, where she teaches courses in creative nonfiction. She lives in Lincoln.

The Wind in the Fire: Sentimentality and the Movement of the Mind

Bruce Bond is the author of fifteen books including For the Lost Cathedral (LSU Press, 2015) and The Other Sky (Etruscan Press, 2015). Four new books are forthcoming: Immanent Distance: Poetry and the Metaphysics of the Near at Hand (University of Michigan Press); Black Anthem (Tampa Review Prize, University of Tampa Press); Gold Bee, winner of the Crab Orchard Open Competition Award (Southern Illinois University Press); and Sacrum (Four Way Books). He holds a Regents Professorship at the University of North Texas.

The Pharmacy of Pain Dissuasion: America’s Addictive Faith in Psychoactive Drugs

David Bosworth’s two most recent books, historical studies of cultural change, are The Demise of Virtue in Virtual America: The Moral Origins of the Great Recession (Front Porch Republic, 2014) and Conscientious Thinking: Making Sense in an Age of Idiot Savants (University of Georgia Press, 2017). A resident of Seattle, he is a professor in (and the former director of) the University of Washington’s creative-writing program.

on Frost in the Low Areas by Karen Skolfield

Adam Tavel’s third poetry collection, Catafalque, won the 2017 Richard Wilbur Book Award (University of Evansville Press, 2018). He is also the author of The Fawn Abyss (Salmon Poetry, 2017) and Plash & Levitation (University of Alaska Press, 2015), the latter a winner of the Permafrost Book Prize in Poetry.

on The Red Wolf: A Dream of Flannery O’Connor by R. T. Smith

Floyd Collins earned his MFA and PhD at the University of Arkansas. A book of critical essays on poetry, The Living Artifact, is forthcoming from Stephen F. Austin University Press in spring 2021. The Teresa Poems will appear from Somondoco Press in fall 2021. His poetry and critical prose appear regularly with The Arkansas Review, The Georgia Review, The Gettysburg Review, and The Kenyon Review.

Reshaping Art’s War Against Nature (on Melissa Kwasny’s Earth Recitals: Essays on Image and Vision; Michael W. Clune’s Writing Against Time; and Ali Smith’s Artful)

Edward Butscher’s poetry and criticism have appeared in numerous literary journals and publications, including the Saturday Review of Literature, Newsday, and the American Book Review. In 1976 he published the first biography of Sylvia Plath, and in 1988 his biography Conrad Aiken: Poet of White Horse Vale won the Poetry Society of America’s Melville Cane Award.

Dubbing Room

Suzanne Cleary won the John Ciardi Prize for Poetry for her third book, Beauty Mark (BkMk Press, 2013). Recipient of a Pushcart Prize, she teaches in the low-residency MFA in creative writing program at Converse College.

First Cool, Windy Evening, with Sail Away Lady; Come Look; & A Can of Tunafish

Coleman Barks, professor emeritus at the University of Georgia, has since 1977 collaborated with various scholars of the Persian language (most notably, John Moyne) to bring over into American free verse the poetry of the thirteenth-century mystic Jelaluddin Rumi. This work has resulted in twenty-one volumes, including the bestselling Essential Rumi in 1995. He has also published eight volumes of his own poetry, including Hummingbird Sleep: Poems 2009–2011 (2012) and Winter Sky: Poems 1968–2008 (2008), both from the University of Georgia Press. 

Sexual & Wind and Water

Gerald Stern’s most recent books are a collection of poems, In Beauty Bright (W. W. Norton, 2012), and a book of essays, Stealing History (Trinity University, 2012). This Time: New and Selected Poems (1998) won the National Book Award, and his numerous other honors include the Ruth Lilly Prize and the Wallace Stevens Award. Stern taught for many years at the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop, and he served as a chancellor of the Academy of American Poets from 2005–2011.